Neglected dog is in search of new home

This Is Wiltshire: The abandoned Staffie The abandoned Staffie

A STAFFORDSHIRE Bull Terrier who lost more than half his body weight after being neglected by his owner is looking for a new home.

The dog, who vets estimate to be between three and five years old, was found in Imber Walk, Penhill, on January 24 and was badly emaciated. He was found with pressure sores and urine scald burns on his limbs.

He is currently being kept at kennels in Faringdon, but his condition has improved considerably since he was first taken in.

Swindon Council is appealing for information to trace his owner as his condition is consistent with being housed in an extremely confined space.

“When he first came in he weighed just 10.6 kilos,” said Alison Waine, Swindon Council’s Environmental Protection Officer. “He probably weighs 20 plus kilos when he is fit and healthy.

“He was totally emaciated to the point that he had complete muscle wastage. The fact that he had sores and urine scald burns would indicate that he was being kept in a crate, tied to a very short lead or confined to a very small space and unable to get out of his own waste. His coat is stained yellow from urine.

“He was in a horrible condition and it is simply neglect that has got him into this state but every day he is making really good progress and he has put on one and a half kilos already since being taken into the kennels. “He is a lovely little boy, slightly timid but friendly and seems good with other dogs too.

“Blue Cross have kindly offered to look after him from Thursday, but they would like to hear from anyone interested in adopting him or other Staffies in their care.”

Anyone who has information about the dog’s owner should contact the council’s animal welfare team on 01793 466014.

For those interested in giving the abandoned dog a home, Blue Cross can be contacted on 0300 777 1570.

Comments (4)

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11:20am Thu 6 Feb 14

RichardR1 says...

It is always tragic when animals are ill treated, but there is no way of knowing what that effect that has had on the dog. Would it be safe around other dogs or children.
It is always tragic when animals are ill treated, but there is no way of knowing what that effect that has had on the dog. Would it be safe around other dogs or children. RichardR1

11:30am Thu 6 Feb 14

Davey Gravey says...

RichardR1 wrote:
It is always tragic when animals are ill treated, but there is no way of knowing what that effect that has had on the dog. Would it be safe around other dogs or children.
If the blue cross are taking him he is in good hands. They will fully assess him and his behaviour before attempting to rehome him.
[quote][p][bold]RichardR1[/bold] wrote: It is always tragic when animals are ill treated, but there is no way of knowing what that effect that has had on the dog. Would it be safe around other dogs or children.[/p][/quote]If the blue cross are taking him he is in good hands. They will fully assess him and his behaviour before attempting to rehome him. Davey Gravey

11:32am Thu 6 Feb 14

Charllie Says says...

A neglected dog should not be tarnished with the status of being an unsafe dog. All dogs are assessed by animal experts before being homed by the Blue Cross, most cases are that a dog should not be homed witha child under 12 unless the history is known. This dog was found in a terrible state and in my experiance they do usually prove to be loving and loyal companions once YOU win their trust. If had stricter laws and tougher sentancing im sure we would see these cases reduce but as it stands they usually are never found and if so get a little fine. if it were a child with the same vunerability it would be front page news.
A neglected dog should not be tarnished with the status of being an unsafe dog. All dogs are assessed by animal experts before being homed by the Blue Cross, most cases are that a dog should not be homed witha child under 12 unless the history is known. This dog was found in a terrible state and in my experiance they do usually prove to be loving and loyal companions once YOU win their trust. If had stricter laws and tougher sentancing im sure we would see these cases reduce but as it stands they usually are never found and if so get a little fine. if it were a child with the same vunerability it would be front page news. Charllie Says

1:15pm Thu 6 Feb 14

Chrisg46 says...

I have utmost respect for RSPCA inspectors/Blue Cross workers - i could not do what they do without either having a break down or doing time for murder!

My boy (Collie, now 3 and a bit) spent the first six months of his life in a cupboard and was only taken out to be beaten. He was eventually rescued but whenever someone came to his kennel, he would cower at the back, until finally he came to realise that not all humans are b*stards. Even so, whenever he meets a new man, he is very cautious...

happily, i don't know where his original keepers are (Cant call them owners), but i would happily lock them in a cupboard and throw away the key, and not a single f would be given.
I have utmost respect for RSPCA inspectors/Blue Cross workers - i could not do what they do without either having a break down or doing time for murder! My boy (Collie, now 3 and a bit) spent the first six months of his life in a cupboard and was only taken out to be beaten. He was eventually rescued but whenever someone came to his kennel, he would cower at the back, until finally he came to realise that not all humans are b*stards. Even so, whenever he meets a new man, he is very cautious... happily, i don't know where his original keepers are (Cant call them owners), but i would happily lock them in a cupboard and throw away the key, and not a single f would be given. Chrisg46

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