Teachers preparing to strike yet again

This Is Wiltshire: Teachers Rachel Rance, Tracy Mason, Peter Smith and Jon Timbrell in March Teachers Rachel Rance, Tracy Mason, Peter Smith and Jon Timbrell in March

SWINDON faces a day of disruption next month as a number of unions across several professions are planning strike action.

The country’s biggest teaching union, the National Union of Teachers (NUT), has announced it is striking on July 10 to coincide with potential action by local government workers.

Unison, GMB and Unite will be balloting their members over taking action on that day as they are angry at a Government pay offer.

It will be the third action carried out by the NUT since last October and it is likely to cause disruption for parents.

In March, several Swindon schools were forced to close while others were only partially open.

The union is in disagreement with the Government over wages and workloads, saying it is defending the future of the profession.

Andy Woolley, South West regional secretary of NUT, said: “The Government is still failing to make progress on our trade dispute over teachers’ pay, pensions and workload.

“The talks are still only about the implementation of Government policies, not about the fundamental issues we believe to be detrimental to education and the profession.

“For teachers, performance-related pay, working until 68 for a full pension and a heavy workload for 60 hours a week, is unsustainable.

“This action is the responsibility of a Government and Education Secretary who are refusing point blank to accept the damage their reforms are doing to the teaching profession. The consequences of turning teaching into a totally unattractive career choice will most certainly lead to teacher shortages.

“Strike action is a last resort for teachers and we deeply regret the disruption it causes parents and pupils. This date has been chosen to cause minimum disruption to examinations.”

The potential strike by local government workers comes after the unions rejected the Government’s offer of a pay increase.

The National Employers’ offer is for increases of between 1.25 and 4.66 per cent for those on the bottom six pay points and one per cent for the remainder of employees, while chief officers have not been offered a pay increase.

Swindon Council offered its workers the same deal and have budgeted for it but it will not be implemented while the union is still in discussions with the Government.

The Government is in dispute with a number of unions over issues such as pay, pensions and reforms to services.

Over the weekend the Fire Brigades’ Union went on strike, the 14th such action in a long-running dispute about proposed changes to pensions. While no more strikes are planned by the union at this stage, no agreement has been reached.

There have also been a number of strike actions by the National Association of Probation Officers who are fighting plans to outsource much of their work to the private sector.

Comments (33)

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7:00am Tue 24 Jun 14

swindondad says...

Why do so many public sector workers seem to be under the false impression that the government has some bottomless pit of money to reward them with.

Get it straight the only money the government has it that which it raises in taxes paid (either directly or indirectly) by US the workers in the private sector.
Why do so many public sector workers seem to be under the false impression that the government has some bottomless pit of money to reward them with. Get it straight the only money the government has it that which it raises in taxes paid (either directly or indirectly) by US the workers in the private sector. swindondad
  • Score: 27

7:39am Tue 24 Jun 14

Alex English says...

The public sector strikes aren't really about money, conditions, terms or pensions. Of course that's what the unions behind them will pretend they're about, and wouldn't say no if the government caved in, but what they're really about is creating an atmosphere of anti-government feeling in the run up to next year's general election, which is now roughly 10 months away.

With the economy doing well and unemployment continuing to fall, Labour know they can't win by using the economy as the whipping boy. They even seem to have quietly stopped using their 'Cost of living crisis' slogan now that it's been shown that families are £20 a month better off than they were last year, a figure that's been rising month on month for 8 months now.

So, it'll be down to the unions, who are the real Labour party, to disrupt everything as much as possible and try to persuade everyone else that the country's in ruins.

Sadly for them, it just gets people angry and irritated and, if anything, has the exact opposite of the effect they're trying to connive.

Hands up anyone in the private sector who's had a 4.66% pay rise this year? Apparently, that's not good enough for the NUT.
The public sector strikes aren't really about money, conditions, terms or pensions. Of course that's what the unions behind them will pretend they're about, and wouldn't say no if the government caved in, but what they're really about is creating an atmosphere of anti-government feeling in the run up to next year's general election, which is now roughly 10 months away. With the economy doing well and unemployment continuing to fall, Labour know they can't win by using the economy as the whipping boy. They even seem to have quietly stopped using their 'Cost of living crisis' slogan now that it's been shown that families are £20 a month better off than they were last year, a figure that's been rising month on month for 8 months now. So, it'll be down to the unions, who are the real Labour party, to disrupt everything as much as possible and try to persuade everyone else that the country's in ruins. Sadly for them, it just gets people angry and irritated and, if anything, has the exact opposite of the effect they're trying to connive. Hands up anyone in the private sector who's had a 4.66% pay rise this year? Apparently, that's not good enough for the NUT. Alex English
  • Score: 24

8:18am Tue 24 Jun 14

house on the hill says...

Alex English wrote:
The public sector strikes aren't really about money, conditions, terms or pensions. Of course that's what the unions behind them will pretend they're about, and wouldn't say no if the government caved in, but what they're really about is creating an atmosphere of anti-government feeling in the run up to next year's general election, which is now roughly 10 months away.

With the economy doing well and unemployment continuing to fall, Labour know they can't win by using the economy as the whipping boy. They even seem to have quietly stopped using their 'Cost of living crisis' slogan now that it's been shown that families are £20 a month better off than they were last year, a figure that's been rising month on month for 8 months now.

So, it'll be down to the unions, who are the real Labour party, to disrupt everything as much as possible and try to persuade everyone else that the country's in ruins.

Sadly for them, it just gets people angry and irritated and, if anything, has the exact opposite of the effect they're trying to connive.

Hands up anyone in the private sector who's had a 4.66% pay rise this year? Apparently, that's not good enough for the NUT.
You forget the final salary pension schemes they also moan about despite them being the best pension plans in the country. They seem to think they are some sort of special case and are immune to the belt tightening that the private sector is continuing to do year on year and as others have said they conveniently forget to mention that it is the tax payer who pays for any increase in their terms and conditions.
They are well paid and have one of the safest jobs in the country with the best terms and conditions of any private sector equivalent and still they moan. Sorry no sympathy whatsoever
[quote][p][bold]Alex English[/bold] wrote: The public sector strikes aren't really about money, conditions, terms or pensions. Of course that's what the unions behind them will pretend they're about, and wouldn't say no if the government caved in, but what they're really about is creating an atmosphere of anti-government feeling in the run up to next year's general election, which is now roughly 10 months away. With the economy doing well and unemployment continuing to fall, Labour know they can't win by using the economy as the whipping boy. They even seem to have quietly stopped using their 'Cost of living crisis' slogan now that it's been shown that families are £20 a month better off than they were last year, a figure that's been rising month on month for 8 months now. So, it'll be down to the unions, who are the real Labour party, to disrupt everything as much as possible and try to persuade everyone else that the country's in ruins. Sadly for them, it just gets people angry and irritated and, if anything, has the exact opposite of the effect they're trying to connive. Hands up anyone in the private sector who's had a 4.66% pay rise this year? Apparently, that's not good enough for the NUT.[/p][/quote]You forget the final salary pension schemes they also moan about despite them being the best pension plans in the country. They seem to think they are some sort of special case and are immune to the belt tightening that the private sector is continuing to do year on year and as others have said they conveniently forget to mention that it is the tax payer who pays for any increase in their terms and conditions. They are well paid and have one of the safest jobs in the country with the best terms and conditions of any private sector equivalent and still they moan. Sorry no sympathy whatsoever house on the hill
  • Score: 19

8:43am Tue 24 Jun 14

South Stand says...

Where are all these teachers that are claiming they work 60 hours a week?
I don't know of any amongst my colleagues.
Where are all these teachers that are claiming they work 60 hours a week? I don't know of any amongst my colleagues. South Stand
  • Score: 16

8:51am Tue 24 Jun 14

Davidsyrett says...

Perhaps all the parents will arrange a week's strike so we can take our kids and a cheaper holiday.
Perhaps all the parents will arrange a week's strike so we can take our kids and a cheaper holiday. Davidsyrett
  • Score: 27

8:57am Tue 24 Jun 14

A.Baron-Cohen says...

Privatize Education
Privatize Education A.Baron-Cohen
  • Score: 3

9:41am Tue 24 Jun 14

Davey Gravey says...

Teachers pay tax too you know!
The contribute as well as anyone else.
Look at how many leave the profession early. Loads do. We need to be asking ourselves why?
Teachers pay tax too you know! The contribute as well as anyone else. Look at how many leave the profession early. Loads do. We need to be asking ourselves why? Davey Gravey
  • Score: -17

9:56am Tue 24 Jun 14

A.Baron-Cohen says...

Davey Gravey wrote:
Teachers pay tax too you know!
The contribute as well as anyone else.
Look at how many leave the profession early. Loads do. We need to be asking ourselves why?
Teachers should not be on the pubic payroll!
They should be private contractors, this would seriously dampen their appetite for Industrial actions.
There are some great teachers, but most of them are just in there for the holidays and the pension, the profession must be privatized!
[quote][p][bold]Davey Gravey[/bold] wrote: Teachers pay tax too you know! The contribute as well as anyone else. Look at how many leave the profession early. Loads do. We need to be asking ourselves why?[/p][/quote]Teachers should not be on the pubic payroll! They should be private contractors, this would seriously dampen their appetite for Industrial actions. There are some great teachers, but most of them are just in there for the holidays and the pension, the profession must be privatized! A.Baron-Cohen
  • Score: 8

10:05am Tue 24 Jun 14

Davey Gravey says...

Maybe teachers should claim pay for the hours and hours they spend preparing lessons and marking work, talking to parents, meetings with fellow teachers,etc etc?
It is a very hard job to do. The pay isn't great for such a tough job either.
Maybe teachers should claim pay for the hours and hours they spend preparing lessons and marking work, talking to parents, meetings with fellow teachers,etc etc? It is a very hard job to do. The pay isn't great for such a tough job either. Davey Gravey
  • Score: -14

10:08am Tue 24 Jun 14

Hmmmf says...

Davey Gravey wrote:
Teachers pay tax too you know!
The contribute as well as anyone else.
Look at how many leave the profession early. Loads do. We need to be asking ourselves why?
Oh wow, they give back a bit of the money we give them. Perhaps your maths teacher was on strike or busy teaching socialist policies for you not to notice it's no contribution at all; if they take a hundred out and give back twenty, the pot's still eighty down.
[quote][p][bold]Davey Gravey[/bold] wrote: Teachers pay tax too you know! The contribute as well as anyone else. Look at how many leave the profession early. Loads do. We need to be asking ourselves why?[/p][/quote]Oh wow, they give back a bit of the money we give them. Perhaps your maths teacher was on strike or busy teaching socialist policies for you not to notice it's no contribution at all; if they take a hundred out and give back twenty, the pot's still eighty down. Hmmmf
  • Score: 13

10:18am Tue 24 Jun 14

Hmmmf says...

Davey Gravey wrote:
Maybe teachers should claim pay for the hours and hours they spend preparing lessons and marking work, talking to parents, meetings with fellow teachers,etc etc?
It is a very hard job to do. The pay isn't great for such a tough job either.
I think that's what they're trying to do with their ludicrous claim of a 60 hour working week. No one forced them to take the job, and listing the day-to-day exigencies of the 'profession' they claim to love so much isn't going to garner any sympathy, especially when they're waving banners and placards side-by-side with their 'comrades'.
[quote][p][bold]Davey Gravey[/bold] wrote: Maybe teachers should claim pay for the hours and hours they spend preparing lessons and marking work, talking to parents, meetings with fellow teachers,etc etc? It is a very hard job to do. The pay isn't great for such a tough job either.[/p][/quote]I think that's what they're trying to do with their ludicrous claim of a 60 hour working week. No one forced them to take the job, and listing the day-to-day exigencies of the 'profession' they claim to love so much isn't going to garner any sympathy, especially when they're waving banners and placards side-by-side with their 'comrades'. Hmmmf
  • Score: 15

10:43am Tue 24 Jun 14

Alex English says...

Davey Gravey wrote:
Teachers pay tax too you know!
The contribute as well as anyone else.
Look at how many leave the profession early. Loads do. We need to be asking ourselves why?
If you would like to give me £1000, I'll give you £350 back and we can then both walk away happy and agreeing I've contributed to your bank balance.

Deal?
[quote][p][bold]Davey Gravey[/bold] wrote: Teachers pay tax too you know! The contribute as well as anyone else. Look at how many leave the profession early. Loads do. We need to be asking ourselves why?[/p][/quote]If you would like to give me £1000, I'll give you £350 back and we can then both walk away happy and agreeing I've contributed to your bank balance. Deal? Alex English
  • Score: 10

10:53am Tue 24 Jun 14

A.Baron-Cohen says...

Davey Gravey wrote:
Maybe teachers should claim pay for the hours and hours they spend preparing lessons and marking work, talking to parents, meetings with fellow teachers,etc etc?
It is a very hard job to do. The pay isn't great for such a tough job either.
There is no need for them to claim any of these extra hours, they get plenty more free time during their extended taxpayer funded holidays.
Yes it is a tough job and so are many other jobs but people do not walk out the office and throw their toys out of the pram, if you cannot take it ultimately you can leave your place of work and try to find something better somewhere else.
[quote][p][bold]Davey Gravey[/bold] wrote: Maybe teachers should claim pay for the hours and hours they spend preparing lessons and marking work, talking to parents, meetings with fellow teachers,etc etc? It is a very hard job to do. The pay isn't great for such a tough job either.[/p][/quote]There is no need for them to claim any of these extra hours, they get plenty more free time during their extended taxpayer funded holidays. Yes it is a tough job and so are many other jobs but people do not walk out the office and throw their toys out of the pram, if you cannot take it ultimately you can leave your place of work and try to find something better somewhere else. A.Baron-Cohen
  • Score: 12

11:14am Tue 24 Jun 14

Davey Gravey says...

So basically you're all just anti publicly paid workers, in a nutshell. This country is **** with such attitudes. Thatchers non society in full effect.
So basically you're all just anti publicly paid workers, in a nutshell. This country is **** with such attitudes. Thatchers non society in full effect. Davey Gravey
  • Score: -19

11:25am Tue 24 Jun 14

Alex English says...

I don't think anyone is 'anti' the vast majority of public sector workers who, generally, do a decent job in return for decent conditions and pay which they are more than aware of before they accept any job offer.

What many people are against are the appalling public sector unions, and the more militant public sector workers, who use our children, health, safety and public services as a political tool to try and achieve their political aims.

We should not be paying for these people to undermine us, the nation and the services we pay for at a very high rate. The majority of people in this country pay tax at a real term level of around 72% of salary. Most of that is spent on welfare and public sector salaries, so it's understandable that people get rather angry when both those groups demand more and more.
I don't think anyone is 'anti' the vast majority of public sector workers who, generally, do a decent job in return for decent conditions and pay which they are more than aware of before they accept any job offer. What many people are against are the appalling public sector unions, and the more militant public sector workers, who use our children, health, safety and public services as a political tool to try and achieve their political aims. We should not be paying for these people to undermine us, the nation and the services we pay for at a very high rate. The majority of people in this country pay tax at a real term level of around 72% of salary. Most of that is spent on welfare and public sector salaries, so it's understandable that people get rather angry when both those groups demand more and more. Alex English
  • Score: 14

11:52am Tue 24 Jun 14

StillPav says...

As a trueblue Tory I am very disappointed with this Government. I can understand 1% pay rises when the economy is struggling, but now we have growth and inflation is over 2%, public sector salaries need to reflect this.

Coupled with the fact that we are spending billions on welfare, it leaves a very bad taste.
As a trueblue Tory I am very disappointed with this Government. I can understand 1% pay rises when the economy is struggling, but now we have growth and inflation is over 2%, public sector salaries need to reflect this. Coupled with the fact that we are spending billions on welfare, it leaves a very bad taste. StillPav
  • Score: -3

11:52am Tue 24 Jun 14

A.Baron-Cohen says...

Davey Gravey wrote:
So basically you're all just anti publicly paid workers, in a nutshell. This country is **** with such attitudes. Thatchers non society in full effect.
There are better ways to provide helpful services to a Society than with public servants and public services.
The size of the State and public services are both on a downward trajectory, because we simply cannot afford them anymore.
[quote][p][bold]Davey Gravey[/bold] wrote: So basically you're all just anti publicly paid workers, in a nutshell. This country is **** with such attitudes. Thatchers non society in full effect.[/p][/quote]There are better ways to provide helpful services to a Society than with public servants and public services. The size of the State and public services are both on a downward trajectory, because we simply cannot afford them anymore. A.Baron-Cohen
  • Score: 8

12:33pm Tue 24 Jun 14

house on the hill says...

A.Baron-Cohen wrote:
Privatize Education
How?????
[quote][p][bold]A.Baron-Cohen[/bold] wrote: Privatize Education[/p][/quote]How????? house on the hill
  • Score: -2

12:48pm Tue 24 Jun 14

A.Baron-Cohen says...

house on the hill wrote:
A.Baron-Cohen wrote:
Privatize Education
How?????
Many ways to do it, we could for example outsource teaching staff, this would be a good start.
[quote][p][bold]house on the hill[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]A.Baron-Cohen[/bold] wrote: Privatize Education[/p][/quote]How?????[/p][/quote]Many ways to do it, we could for example outsource teaching staff, this would be a good start. A.Baron-Cohen
  • Score: 3

12:51pm Tue 24 Jun 14

house on the hill says...

Davey Gravey wrote:
Maybe teachers should claim pay for the hours and hours they spend preparing lessons and marking work, talking to parents, meetings with fellow teachers,etc etc?
It is a very hard job to do. The pay isn't great for such a tough job either.
so get another job like millions of us have when we don't like the ones we have, even moving to different areas. Never understood why people moan about something they have complete control over. I have done about a dozen different jobs in over 20 locations in very different professions over the years, either through forced redundancy or just wanting to better myself. life isn't handed to you on a plate you have to go out there and make your life for yourself!
[quote][p][bold]Davey Gravey[/bold] wrote: Maybe teachers should claim pay for the hours and hours they spend preparing lessons and marking work, talking to parents, meetings with fellow teachers,etc etc? It is a very hard job to do. The pay isn't great for such a tough job either.[/p][/quote]so get another job like millions of us have when we don't like the ones we have, even moving to different areas. Never understood why people moan about something they have complete control over. I have done about a dozen different jobs in over 20 locations in very different professions over the years, either through forced redundancy or just wanting to better myself. life isn't handed to you on a plate you have to go out there and make your life for yourself! house on the hill
  • Score: 8

2:29pm Tue 24 Jun 14

trolley dolley says...

Teachers, Hospital cleaners etc. They are all the same.

Wrong people in the wrong job, but they wont leave.

Why.
Teachers, Hospital cleaners etc. They are all the same. Wrong people in the wrong job, but they wont leave. Why. trolley dolley
  • Score: 3

3:54pm Tue 24 Jun 14

Wildwestener says...

swindondad wrote:
Why do so many public sector workers seem to be under the false impression that the government has some bottomless pit of money to reward them with.

Get it straight the only money the government has it that which it raises in taxes paid (either directly or indirectly) by US the workers in the private sector.
People who work in the public sector are paid for their efforts and then they pay the same tax as you do. What you probably mean is that the private sector generates the money which allows workers in both private and public sector to be paid and to then pay their taxes. It is not the same thing and insinuating otherwise diminishes your argument.
Having worked in both sectors in my career, I can assure you that there are brilliant people in the public and the private sector. There are also self-serving chancers and layabouts In both too.
I suppose having a grown up discussion not prejudiced by unsubstantiated dogma is too much to ask for on here.
[quote][p][bold]swindondad[/bold] wrote: Why do so many public sector workers seem to be under the false impression that the government has some bottomless pit of money to reward them with. Get it straight the only money the government has it that which it raises in taxes paid (either directly or indirectly) by US the workers in the private sector.[/p][/quote]People who work in the public sector are paid for their efforts and then they pay the same tax as you do. What you probably mean is that the private sector generates the money which allows workers in both private and public sector to be paid and to then pay their taxes. It is not the same thing and insinuating otherwise diminishes your argument. Having worked in both sectors in my career, I can assure you that there are brilliant people in the public and the private sector. There are also self-serving chancers and layabouts In both too. I suppose having a grown up discussion not prejudiced by unsubstantiated dogma is too much to ask for on here. Wildwestener
  • Score: -6

3:58pm Tue 24 Jun 14

redbythesea says...

Amazing isn't it. As soon as the sun starts shining the teachers decide it's a good time to call a strike. Why not hold a day of protest during your vastly extended holidays. In fact you could have 30 days of protest! So not content with pay rises that exceed those given to most private sector workers, pensions we can only dream about, more holidays you can shake a stick at, and the glory of telling the world how they love their job and they are doing it for the kids. Hypocritical, parasitic, leeches.
Amazing isn't it. As soon as the sun starts shining the teachers decide it's a good time to call a strike. Why not hold a day of protest during your vastly extended holidays. In fact you could have 30 days of protest! So not content with pay rises that exceed those given to most private sector workers, pensions we can only dream about, more holidays you can shake a stick at, and the glory of telling the world how they love their job and they are doing it for the kids. Hypocritical, parasitic, leeches. redbythesea
  • Score: 10

5:17pm Tue 24 Jun 14

Alex English says...

Wildwestener wrote:
swindondad wrote:
Why do so many public sector workers seem to be under the false impression that the government has some bottomless pit of money to reward them with.

Get it straight the only money the government has it that which it raises in taxes paid (either directly or indirectly) by US the workers in the private sector.
People who work in the public sector are paid for their efforts and then they pay the same tax as you do. What you probably mean is that the private sector generates the money which allows workers in both private and public sector to be paid and to then pay their taxes. It is not the same thing and insinuating otherwise diminishes your argument.
Having worked in both sectors in my career, I can assure you that there are brilliant people in the public and the private sector. There are also self-serving chancers and layabouts In both too.
I suppose having a grown up discussion not prejudiced by unsubstantiated dogma is too much to ask for on here.
The major difference is that private sector workers do not disrupt your child's education and force you to take time off from your own employment as a means to blackmail their employers into giving them more of your money.
[quote][p][bold]Wildwestener[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]swindondad[/bold] wrote: Why do so many public sector workers seem to be under the false impression that the government has some bottomless pit of money to reward them with. Get it straight the only money the government has it that which it raises in taxes paid (either directly or indirectly) by US the workers in the private sector.[/p][/quote]People who work in the public sector are paid for their efforts and then they pay the same tax as you do. What you probably mean is that the private sector generates the money which allows workers in both private and public sector to be paid and to then pay their taxes. It is not the same thing and insinuating otherwise diminishes your argument. Having worked in both sectors in my career, I can assure you that there are brilliant people in the public and the private sector. There are also self-serving chancers and layabouts In both too. I suppose having a grown up discussion not prejudiced by unsubstantiated dogma is too much to ask for on here.[/p][/quote]The major difference is that private sector workers do not disrupt your child's education and force you to take time off from your own employment as a means to blackmail their employers into giving them more of your money. Alex English
  • Score: 6

5:51pm Tue 24 Jun 14

asimo says...

Nice to see working class professionals fighting to retain what is rightfully theirs. . . such as the Fire Services, Doctors, Nurses, Consultants, Solicitors, Barristers and Police services all noble of capital letters. To all those who are attacking these pillars of our society ask yourself this . . . What makes such dedicated and highly educated people revert to striking ?Could it just be strong armed, bully boy tactics by aggressive employers or governments, (regardless of who holds office). All the drivel about private sectors not gaining any pay rises is probably because they have less statutory protection (fired at will of employer) are not unionised (fired at will of employer) and quite frankly probabley full of non British workers that good old blighty wish to pay peanuts for services for labour. Millions of families holding down work, some with two or three jobs, just to survive. This is the pre-cursor insisted on by goverments and employers as the acceptable face of Great Britain, the 7th richest place on earth is an absolute disgrace. What the UK need is a National Strike, yes, a National all out Strike, together from all walks of life to tell employers, goverments and our MPs that the British working class have had enough. To the spiteful, feckless, self righteous brigde who are attacking any one who strikes I say " up yours". To all the strikers I say never give up and fight for your contractual rights. . . I don't have children yet, haven't needed any of the professionals I refer to but despite all of this I absolutely support anyones right to with draw their labour when faced with aggressive employers, private or public.
Nice to see working class professionals fighting to retain what is rightfully theirs. . . such as the Fire Services, Doctors, Nurses, Consultants, Solicitors, Barristers and Police services all noble of capital letters. To all those who are attacking these pillars of our society ask yourself this . . . What makes such dedicated and highly educated people revert to striking ?Could it just be strong armed, bully boy tactics by aggressive employers or governments, (regardless of who holds office). All the drivel about private sectors not gaining any pay rises is probably because they have less statutory protection (fired at will of employer) are not unionised (fired at will of employer) and quite frankly probabley full of non British workers that good old blighty wish to pay peanuts for services for labour. Millions of families holding down work, some with two or three jobs, just to survive. This is the pre-cursor insisted on by goverments and employers as the acceptable face of Great Britain, the 7th richest place on earth is an absolute disgrace. What the UK need is a National Strike, yes, a National all out Strike, together from all walks of life to tell employers, goverments and our MPs that the British working class have had enough. To the spiteful, feckless, self righteous brigde who are attacking any one who strikes I say " up yours". To all the strikers I say never give up and fight for your contractual rights. . . I don't have children yet, haven't needed any of the professionals I refer to but despite all of this I absolutely support anyones right to with draw their labour when faced with aggressive employers, private or public. asimo
  • Score: -7

8:18pm Tue 24 Jun 14

Wildwestener says...

Wildwestener wrote:
swindondad wrote:
Why do so many public sector workers seem to be under the false impression that the government has some bottomless pit of money to reward them with.

Get it straight the only money the government has it that which it raises in taxes paid (either directly or indirectly) by US the workers in the private sector.
People who work in the public sector are paid for their efforts and then they pay the same tax as you do. What you probably mean is that the private sector generates the money which allows workers in both private and public sector to be paid and to then pay their taxes. It is not the same thing and insinuating otherwise diminishes your argument.
Having worked in both sectors in my career, I can assure you that there are brilliant people in the public and the private sector. There are also self-serving chancers and layabouts In both too.
I suppose having a grown up discussion not prejudiced by unsubstantiated dogma is too much to ask for on here.
Judging by the thumbs down on my last post, people clearly don't want to talk facts, just come out with the usual rubbish they can't back up with any logical arguments.
One thought for all those bashing everyone in the public sector - the banks are private and nearly destroyed the economy through greed. Everyone, whether a public or private sector worker, has paid for that since 2008 with their jobs, increased pension payments (yes in public sector too before those who speak more than they know say anything) and longer working lives, reduced services etc. The bankers continue to take £m bonuses and laugh their backsides off at all of you for defending the system that allows them to take you for every penny you've got and then blame people equally impoverished as you instead of them.

I don't actually support the teachers who want to strike but guess what, we live in a democracy and they are acting legally so fair enough.
[quote][p][bold]Wildwestener[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]swindondad[/bold] wrote: Why do so many public sector workers seem to be under the false impression that the government has some bottomless pit of money to reward them with. Get it straight the only money the government has it that which it raises in taxes paid (either directly or indirectly) by US the workers in the private sector.[/p][/quote]People who work in the public sector are paid for their efforts and then they pay the same tax as you do. What you probably mean is that the private sector generates the money which allows workers in both private and public sector to be paid and to then pay their taxes. It is not the same thing and insinuating otherwise diminishes your argument. Having worked in both sectors in my career, I can assure you that there are brilliant people in the public and the private sector. There are also self-serving chancers and layabouts In both too. I suppose having a grown up discussion not prejudiced by unsubstantiated dogma is too much to ask for on here.[/p][/quote]Judging by the thumbs down on my last post, people clearly don't want to talk facts, just come out with the usual rubbish they can't back up with any logical arguments. One thought for all those bashing everyone in the public sector - the banks are private and nearly destroyed the economy through greed. Everyone, whether a public or private sector worker, has paid for that since 2008 with their jobs, increased pension payments (yes in public sector too before those who speak more than they know say anything) and longer working lives, reduced services etc. The bankers continue to take £m bonuses and laugh their backsides off at all of you for defending the system that allows them to take you for every penny you've got and then blame people equally impoverished as you instead of them. I don't actually support the teachers who want to strike but guess what, we live in a democracy and they are acting legally so fair enough. Wildwestener
  • Score: -10

8:53pm Tue 24 Jun 14

highfive says...

Would you like your pension contribution matched 200% each month by your employer? Statistically the reason so many are leaving the profession is because they are retiring early on their lucrative pensions. No other profession has such a sense of self entitlement. Sickening.
Would you like your pension contribution matched 200% each month by your employer? Statistically the reason so many are leaving the profession is because they are retiring early on their lucrative pensions. No other profession has such a sense of self entitlement. Sickening. highfive
  • Score: 7

9:25pm Tue 24 Jun 14

Nogitsune says...

South Stand wrote:
Where are all these teachers that are claiming they work 60 hours a week?
I don't know of any amongst my colleagues.
They are working on their marking, planning, making resources, assessing children, filling in paperwork that serves no useful purpose and trying to maintain unrealistic targets set by a government that are out of touch with what is actually happening in the classroom. Oh and they are also trying to teach! If you don't know any colleagues in your place of work that have worked above and beyond their normal school day - working during their lunch breaks and after school to late in the evening or devoting part or whole weekends to school related work - then please tell us the name of the educational establishment you work in as I'm sure that there would be a lot of teachers who would like to work there!
[quote][p][bold]South Stand[/bold] wrote: Where are all these teachers that are claiming they work 60 hours a week? I don't know of any amongst my colleagues.[/p][/quote]They are working on their marking, planning, making resources, assessing children, filling in paperwork that serves no useful purpose and trying to maintain unrealistic targets set by a government that are out of touch with what is actually happening in the classroom. Oh and they are also trying to teach! If you don't know any colleagues in your place of work that have worked above and beyond their normal school day - working during their lunch breaks and after school to late in the evening or devoting part or whole weekends to school related work - then please tell us the name of the educational establishment you work in as I'm sure that there would be a lot of teachers who would like to work there! Nogitsune
  • Score: -4

10:21pm Tue 24 Jun 14

Ollie Dognacky says...

At least this isn't down to a long past 13 years of Labour blah blah blah
At least this isn't down to a long past 13 years of Labour blah blah blah Ollie Dognacky
  • Score: -6

8:47am Wed 25 Jun 14

Wildwestener says...

Nogitsune wrote:
South Stand wrote:
Where are all these teachers that are claiming they work 60 hours a week?
I don't know of any amongst my colleagues.
They are working on their marking, planning, making resources, assessing children, filling in paperwork that serves no useful purpose and trying to maintain unrealistic targets set by a government that are out of touch with what is actually happening in the classroom. Oh and they are also trying to teach! If you don't know any colleagues in your place of work that have worked above and beyond their normal school day - working during their lunch breaks and after school to late in the evening or devoting part or whole weekends to school related work - then please tell us the name of the educational establishment you work in as I'm sure that there would be a lot of teachers who would like to work there!
I wouldn't bother Nogitsune, some of the posters on here are only interested in hoisting their offensive, bigoted, none-informed diatribes on the rest of us. They aren't in the slightest bit interested in reality.
[quote][p][bold]Nogitsune[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]South Stand[/bold] wrote: Where are all these teachers that are claiming they work 60 hours a week? I don't know of any amongst my colleagues.[/p][/quote]They are working on their marking, planning, making resources, assessing children, filling in paperwork that serves no useful purpose and trying to maintain unrealistic targets set by a government that are out of touch with what is actually happening in the classroom. Oh and they are also trying to teach! If you don't know any colleagues in your place of work that have worked above and beyond their normal school day - working during their lunch breaks and after school to late in the evening or devoting part or whole weekends to school related work - then please tell us the name of the educational establishment you work in as I'm sure that there would be a lot of teachers who would like to work there![/p][/quote]I wouldn't bother Nogitsune, some of the posters on here are only interested in hoisting their offensive, bigoted, none-informed diatribes on the rest of us. They aren't in the slightest bit interested in reality. Wildwestener
  • Score: -4

8:52am Wed 25 Jun 14

A.Baron-Cohen says...

asimo wrote:
Nice to see working class professionals fighting to retain what is rightfully theirs. . . such as the Fire Services, Doctors, Nurses, Consultants, Solicitors, Barristers and Police services all noble of capital letters. To all those who are attacking these pillars of our society ask yourself this . . . What makes such dedicated and highly educated people revert to striking ?Could it just be strong armed, bully boy tactics by aggressive employers or governments, (regardless of who holds office). All the drivel about private sectors not gaining any pay rises is probably because they have less statutory protection (fired at will of employer) are not unionised (fired at will of employer) and quite frankly probabley full of non British workers that good old blighty wish to pay peanuts for services for labour. Millions of families holding down work, some with two or three jobs, just to survive. This is the pre-cursor insisted on by goverments and employers as the acceptable face of Great Britain, the 7th richest place on earth is an absolute disgrace. What the UK need is a National Strike, yes, a National all out Strike, together from all walks of life to tell employers, goverments and our MPs that the British working class have had enough. To the spiteful, feckless, self righteous brigde who are attacking any one who strikes I say " up yours". To all the strikers I say never give up and fight for your contractual rights. . . I don't have children yet, haven't needed any of the professionals I refer to but despite all of this I absolutely support anyones right to with draw their labour when faced with aggressive employers, private or public.
These Services are paid for by us and by a long way we are not able to cover the full cost of these services, thus increasing the National Debt.
We certainly do not need a National Strike, but we need to wake up and realize that there are 2.5+billions people in the world just waiting for an opportunity to take your job and mine and our kids and grand kids...
Unions, protection etc... that was all very well 100 years ago, but with global Labour market competition the best way to remain in the race is to up our game not throwing our toys out of the pram!
Employers have to be aggressive to survive, and thrive, this is a war are you on the side of your country doing your bit for your employer or are you working for the enemy?
Your call!
[quote][p][bold]asimo[/bold] wrote: Nice to see working class professionals fighting to retain what is rightfully theirs. . . such as the Fire Services, Doctors, Nurses, Consultants, Solicitors, Barristers and Police services all noble of capital letters. To all those who are attacking these pillars of our society ask yourself this . . . What makes such dedicated and highly educated people revert to striking ?Could it just be strong armed, bully boy tactics by aggressive employers or governments, (regardless of who holds office). All the drivel about private sectors not gaining any pay rises is probably because they have less statutory protection (fired at will of employer) are not unionised (fired at will of employer) and quite frankly probabley full of non British workers that good old blighty wish to pay peanuts for services for labour. Millions of families holding down work, some with two or three jobs, just to survive. This is the pre-cursor insisted on by goverments and employers as the acceptable face of Great Britain, the 7th richest place on earth is an absolute disgrace. What the UK need is a National Strike, yes, a National all out Strike, together from all walks of life to tell employers, goverments and our MPs that the British working class have had enough. To the spiteful, feckless, self righteous brigde who are attacking any one who strikes I say " up yours". To all the strikers I say never give up and fight for your contractual rights. . . I don't have children yet, haven't needed any of the professionals I refer to but despite all of this I absolutely support anyones right to with draw their labour when faced with aggressive employers, private or public.[/p][/quote]These Services are paid for by us and by a long way we are not able to cover the full cost of these services, thus increasing the National Debt. We certainly do not need a National Strike, but we need to wake up and realize that there are 2.5+billions people in the world just waiting for an opportunity to take your job and mine and our kids and grand kids... Unions, protection etc... that was all very well 100 years ago, but with global Labour market competition the best way to remain in the race is to up our game not throwing our toys out of the pram! Employers have to be aggressive to survive, and thrive, this is a war are you on the side of your country doing your bit for your employer or are you working for the enemy? Your call! A.Baron-Cohen
  • Score: 6

8:56am Wed 25 Jun 14

A.Baron-Cohen says...

Nogitsune wrote:
South Stand wrote:
Where are all these teachers that are claiming they work 60 hours a week?
I don't know of any amongst my colleagues.
They are working on their marking, planning, making resources, assessing children, filling in paperwork that serves no useful purpose and trying to maintain unrealistic targets set by a government that are out of touch with what is actually happening in the classroom. Oh and they are also trying to teach! If you don't know any colleagues in your place of work that have worked above and beyond their normal school day - working during their lunch breaks and after school to late in the evening or devoting part or whole weekends to school related work - then please tell us the name of the educational establishment you work in as I'm sure that there would be a lot of teachers who would like to work there!
If teachers wants to get paid for the out of school hours/work they do, then I would not pay them any holidays!
[quote][p][bold]Nogitsune[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]South Stand[/bold] wrote: Where are all these teachers that are claiming they work 60 hours a week? I don't know of any amongst my colleagues.[/p][/quote]They are working on their marking, planning, making resources, assessing children, filling in paperwork that serves no useful purpose and trying to maintain unrealistic targets set by a government that are out of touch with what is actually happening in the classroom. Oh and they are also trying to teach! If you don't know any colleagues in your place of work that have worked above and beyond their normal school day - working during their lunch breaks and after school to late in the evening or devoting part or whole weekends to school related work - then please tell us the name of the educational establishment you work in as I'm sure that there would be a lot of teachers who would like to work there![/p][/quote]If teachers wants to get paid for the out of school hours/work they do, then I would not pay them any holidays! A.Baron-Cohen
  • Score: 3

9:08am Wed 25 Jun 14

Alex English says...

Wildwestener wrote:
Nogitsune wrote:
South Stand wrote:
Where are all these teachers that are claiming they work 60 hours a week?
I don't know of any amongst my colleagues.
They are working on their marking, planning, making resources, assessing children, filling in paperwork that serves no useful purpose and trying to maintain unrealistic targets set by a government that are out of touch with what is actually happening in the classroom. Oh and they are also trying to teach! If you don't know any colleagues in your place of work that have worked above and beyond their normal school day - working during their lunch breaks and after school to late in the evening or devoting part or whole weekends to school related work - then please tell us the name of the educational establishment you work in as I'm sure that there would be a lot of teachers who would like to work there!
I wouldn't bother Nogitsune, some of the posters on here are only interested in hoisting their offensive, bigoted, none-informed diatribes on the rest of us. They aren't in the slightest bit interested in reality.
You mean, they don't agree with your point of view?

The reality here is that the UK does not generate anything like enough in tax receipts and other revenues to afford the massive state spending it indulges in. We're still having to borrow at record levels to pay for state sector spending, public services and welfare.

Given that the average working person now pays around 72% of their income across all the various taxations we're subjected to, it's clear there's no more money to be gleaned.

That being the case, why do public sector workers - whose salaries have outstripped equivalent private sector workers for many years now - feel they should be given pay rises of 5% and over?

When they try and take more money from people who may well have had no pay rise for several years by disrupting those people's children's education and causing them significant inconvenience and additional expense, it's little wonder people have no sympathy for the militant whingers.

All of that said, I know of several teachers who are totally embarrassed by the NUT's antics.
[quote][p][bold]Wildwestener[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Nogitsune[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]South Stand[/bold] wrote: Where are all these teachers that are claiming they work 60 hours a week? I don't know of any amongst my colleagues.[/p][/quote]They are working on their marking, planning, making resources, assessing children, filling in paperwork that serves no useful purpose and trying to maintain unrealistic targets set by a government that are out of touch with what is actually happening in the classroom. Oh and they are also trying to teach! If you don't know any colleagues in your place of work that have worked above and beyond their normal school day - working during their lunch breaks and after school to late in the evening or devoting part or whole weekends to school related work - then please tell us the name of the educational establishment you work in as I'm sure that there would be a lot of teachers who would like to work there![/p][/quote]I wouldn't bother Nogitsune, some of the posters on here are only interested in hoisting their offensive, bigoted, none-informed diatribes on the rest of us. They aren't in the slightest bit interested in reality.[/p][/quote]You mean, they don't agree with your point of view? The reality here is that the UK does not generate anything like enough in tax receipts and other revenues to afford the massive state spending it indulges in. We're still having to borrow at record levels to pay for state sector spending, public services and welfare. Given that the average working person now pays around 72% of their income across all the various taxations we're subjected to, it's clear there's no more money to be gleaned. That being the case, why do public sector workers - whose salaries have outstripped equivalent private sector workers for many years now - feel they should be given pay rises of 5% and over? When they try and take more money from people who may well have had no pay rise for several years by disrupting those people's children's education and causing them significant inconvenience and additional expense, it's little wonder people have no sympathy for the militant whingers. All of that said, I know of several teachers who are totally embarrassed by the NUT's antics. Alex English
  • Score: 4

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