Town’s flab fight goes on

This Is Wiltshire: Town’s flab fight goes on Town’s flab fight goes on

DESPITE efforts to put the people of Swindon on a healthier path, the town remains the fat capital of Europe with more than 70 per cent of adults described as carrying excess weight.

According to the latest figures released by the local authority, 70.4 per cent of the entire adult population in Swindon has excess weight.

The prevalence of overweight residents is 47.7 per cent, much higher than the 40.8 per cent recorded nationwide or the 40 per cent reported in the South West.

Obesity levels however are in line with the rest of England at 22.6 per cent.

The increasinging obesity levels have led to a resurgence in ‘Victorian illnesses’ in Swindon, such as gout a condition closely linked to obesity and unhealthy lifestyles.

In the last year alone hospital admissions for gout, a type of arthritis caused by a build-up of uric acid in the blood, rose by 28 per cent.

Speaking to the Adver about the rise in reported cases, Dr Lyn Williamson claimed that Swindon’s status as fat capital of Europe was notorious and went a long way to explain the trend in the town.

“Swindon is the fat capital of Europe. Ten or 14 years ago the average BMI was 28/30 and it’s now 30/33,” she said.

“For a majority of people it’s lifestyle-related.

In the Victorian times rich people had gout because they had red meat, wine and rich food, and now unfortunately our population has changed and it’s poorer people that are eating excessively who get it.

“It’s mostly diets of steak, beer, fizzy drinks and sweetened drinks.

Health chiefs also spent £3m alone, or 10 per cent of the prescribing budget, on diabetes drugs in Swindon in the last year – this was mostly to treat type two diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes usually strikes adults and is associated with being overweight and leading less healthy lifestyles.

This is despite various campaigns, all with positive results, to encourage people to take up physical activity and change their eating habits in Swindon.

Between October 2005 and October 2013, the number of Swindon adults participating in the recommended amount of physical activity rose from 19.6 per cent to 25 per cent.

But excess weight levels remain extremely high among the population.

Fiona Dickens, a dietitian and public health programme manager at Swindon Council, said: “Levels of obesity and being overweight are high in Swindon and this is also a growing issue nationally, across Europe and indeed the world. Although our levels are above average, we are by no means exceptional.

“The Active People survey, which gives the most recent local statistics in this area, demonstrates this. Tackling the problem is important, as evidence shows that those who carry excess weight are at higher risk of a number of diseases including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dementia and some cancers.

“Providing information and support to people living in Swindon to achieve and maintain a healthy weight is a priority for us and the council invests in a number of services which can help.

“Evidence shows that the best way to lose weight is to make long-term changes to diet and physical activity that can become a part of a daily routine.

“These changes can include things such as such as eating at regular times, for instance not skipping breakfast, eating less and choosing food and drinks that are lower in fat, sugar and alcohol.

“Regular physical activity will not only help control weight, but could also reduce the risk of developing a range of serious illnesses and improve an overall sense of wellbeing.

l For more information about leisure activities and facilities available go to www.leisureinswindon.co.uk.

Comments (17)

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7:59am Sat 16 Aug 14

NorthernWarrior says...

A joined up and efficient cycle network would be a start, so people can get out and do some sustained exercise. At the moment, even the much lauded Western Flyer is broken up with sections of road or rough path. If you want to go from West Swindon to Cricklade or beyond to South Cerney along the old railway track, you need to use the narrow (and dangerous) Tadpole Lane and Hayes Knoll at Blunsdon before you can rejoin the path.

Not saying that's the only solution - the supermarkets also have a part to play, especially Asda who pile fattening snacks by the entrance at their West Swindon store while the fruit and veg section is poorly stocked with over-priced and nearly out of date produce.
A joined up and efficient cycle network would be a start, so people can get out and do some sustained exercise. At the moment, even the much lauded Western Flyer is broken up with sections of road or rough path. If you want to go from West Swindon to Cricklade or beyond to South Cerney along the old railway track, you need to use the narrow (and dangerous) Tadpole Lane and Hayes Knoll at Blunsdon before you can rejoin the path. Not saying that's the only solution - the supermarkets also have a part to play, especially Asda who pile fattening snacks by the entrance at their West Swindon store while the fruit and veg section is poorly stocked with over-priced and nearly out of date produce. NorthernWarrior
  • Score: 20

9:43am Sat 16 Aug 14

Alan Bast*rd says...

NorthernWarrior wrote:
A joined up and efficient cycle network would be a start, so people can get out and do some sustained exercise. At the moment, even the much lauded Western Flyer is broken up with sections of road or rough path. If you want to go from West Swindon to Cricklade or beyond to South Cerney along the old railway track, you need to use the narrow (and dangerous) Tadpole Lane and Hayes Knoll at Blunsdon before you can rejoin the path.

Not saying that's the only solution - the supermarkets also have a part to play, especially Asda who pile fattening snacks by the entrance at their West Swindon store while the fruit and veg section is poorly stocked with over-priced and nearly out of date produce.
You think this government of cuts would do anything like that?
Maybe a cycle tax should be brought in to fund it?
Trouble is moronic cyclists still get in the way of cars and ignore cycle paths that are available already.
I like the idea of cycle paths networks and think eventually due to the population explosion it will happen one day. That day won't be soon though.
[quote][p][bold]NorthernWarrior[/bold] wrote: A joined up and efficient cycle network would be a start, so people can get out and do some sustained exercise. At the moment, even the much lauded Western Flyer is broken up with sections of road or rough path. If you want to go from West Swindon to Cricklade or beyond to South Cerney along the old railway track, you need to use the narrow (and dangerous) Tadpole Lane and Hayes Knoll at Blunsdon before you can rejoin the path. Not saying that's the only solution - the supermarkets also have a part to play, especially Asda who pile fattening snacks by the entrance at their West Swindon store while the fruit and veg section is poorly stocked with over-priced and nearly out of date produce.[/p][/quote]You think this government of cuts would do anything like that? Maybe a cycle tax should be brought in to fund it? Trouble is moronic cyclists still get in the way of cars and ignore cycle paths that are available already. I like the idea of cycle paths networks and think eventually due to the population explosion it will happen one day. That day won't be soon though. Alan Bast*rd
  • Score: -17

12:48pm Sat 16 Aug 14

swindonurock says...

NorthernWarrior wrote:
A joined up and efficient cycle network would be a start, so people can get out and do some sustained exercise. At the moment, even the much lauded Western Flyer is broken up with sections of road or rough path. If you want to go from West Swindon to Cricklade or beyond to South Cerney along the old railway track, you need to use the narrow (and dangerous) Tadpole Lane and Hayes Knoll at Blunsdon before you can rejoin the path.

Not saying that's the only solution - the supermarkets also have a part to play, especially Asda who pile fattening snacks by the entrance at their West Swindon store while the fruit and veg section is poorly stocked with over-priced and nearly out of date produce.
You really think that if Swindon invested in a cycle network and supermarkets altered their snack displays, etc, that it would make any difference? I think it would make zero difference.

While your post is not entirely devoid of logic, neither of those suggestions would mean anything unless people's attitude towards their weight and health changed first.

For whatever reason, people in Swindon (and elsewhere, of course) are simply ignoring the plentiful healthy-diet and exercise advise that is out there, and it's become not only socially acceptable, but the social norm, to be obese or overweight.

People's attitude needs a radical overhaul, and I guess one of the best ways to start changing it is with a media-driven re-education drive. People need to learn the health risks of poor diet and lack of exercise and, more importantly, how to create a healthier lifestyle for themselves.

There are lots of facilities in Swindon for all kinds of exercise - including walking along pavements instead of getting into the car or bus - just as there is healthy food available everywhere, but it's all pointless unless you change people's attitudes in the first instance.

Given all of the corn-syrup, sugar, artificial sweeteners, colourings and flavourings, and other junk which often goes into food these days, (even much of the so-called healthy food) it can be a task to figure out how to change to a healthier diet, but it's certainly not impossible: in fact the easiest way is to simply buy as little processed food as possible (as it's almost all rubbish, despite what the packet may say) and to buy lots of fresh food i(fruit, vegetables, fresh fish and meat, etc), instead.
[quote][p][bold]NorthernWarrior[/bold] wrote: A joined up and efficient cycle network would be a start, so people can get out and do some sustained exercise. At the moment, even the much lauded Western Flyer is broken up with sections of road or rough path. If you want to go from West Swindon to Cricklade or beyond to South Cerney along the old railway track, you need to use the narrow (and dangerous) Tadpole Lane and Hayes Knoll at Blunsdon before you can rejoin the path. Not saying that's the only solution - the supermarkets also have a part to play, especially Asda who pile fattening snacks by the entrance at their West Swindon store while the fruit and veg section is poorly stocked with over-priced and nearly out of date produce.[/p][/quote]You really think that if Swindon invested in a cycle network and supermarkets altered their snack displays, etc, that it would make any difference? I think it would make zero difference. While your post is not entirely devoid of logic, neither of those suggestions would mean anything unless people's attitude towards their weight and health changed first. For whatever reason, people in Swindon (and elsewhere, of course) are simply ignoring the plentiful healthy-diet and exercise advise that is out there, and it's become not only socially acceptable, but the social norm, to be obese or overweight. People's attitude needs a radical overhaul, and I guess one of the best ways to start changing it is with a media-driven re-education drive. People need to learn the health risks of poor diet and lack of exercise and, more importantly, how to create a healthier lifestyle for themselves. There are lots of facilities in Swindon for all kinds of exercise - including walking along pavements instead of getting into the car or bus - just as there is healthy food available everywhere, but it's all pointless unless you change people's attitudes in the first instance. Given all of the corn-syrup, sugar, artificial sweeteners, colourings and flavourings, and other junk which often goes into food these days, (even much of the so-called healthy food) it can be a task to figure out how to change to a healthier diet, but it's certainly not impossible: in fact the easiest way is to simply buy as little processed food as possible (as it's almost all rubbish, despite what the packet may say) and to buy lots of fresh food i(fruit, vegetables, fresh fish and meat, etc), instead. swindonurock
  • Score: 17

2:48pm Sat 16 Aug 14

house on the hill says...

swindonurock wrote:
NorthernWarrior wrote:
A joined up and efficient cycle network would be a start, so people can get out and do some sustained exercise. At the moment, even the much lauded Western Flyer is broken up with sections of road or rough path. If you want to go from West Swindon to Cricklade or beyond to South Cerney along the old railway track, you need to use the narrow (and dangerous) Tadpole Lane and Hayes Knoll at Blunsdon before you can rejoin the path.

Not saying that's the only solution - the supermarkets also have a part to play, especially Asda who pile fattening snacks by the entrance at their West Swindon store while the fruit and veg section is poorly stocked with over-priced and nearly out of date produce.
You really think that if Swindon invested in a cycle network and supermarkets altered their snack displays, etc, that it would make any difference? I think it would make zero difference.

While your post is not entirely devoid of logic, neither of those suggestions would mean anything unless people's attitude towards their weight and health changed first.

For whatever reason, people in Swindon (and elsewhere, of course) are simply ignoring the plentiful healthy-diet and exercise advise that is out there, and it's become not only socially acceptable, but the social norm, to be obese or overweight.

People's attitude needs a radical overhaul, and I guess one of the best ways to start changing it is with a media-driven re-education drive. People need to learn the health risks of poor diet and lack of exercise and, more importantly, how to create a healthier lifestyle for themselves.

There are lots of facilities in Swindon for all kinds of exercise - including walking along pavements instead of getting into the car or bus - just as there is healthy food available everywhere, but it's all pointless unless you change people's attitudes in the first instance.

Given all of the corn-syrup, sugar, artificial sweeteners, colourings and flavourings, and other junk which often goes into food these days, (even much of the so-called healthy food) it can be a task to figure out how to change to a healthier diet, but it's certainly not impossible: in fact the easiest way is to simply buy as little processed food as possible (as it's almost all rubbish, despite what the packet may say) and to buy lots of fresh food i(fruit, vegetables, fresh fish and meat, etc), instead.
Very good post indeed. Most things in todays world come down to attitude as attitudes drive behaviour, so with the wrong attitude all the cycle networks, free gyms and health food shops in the world won't end the obesity out there. Add to that the excuse and blame culture (supermarkets get us fat and drunk, fast food outlets make us fat and lazy, advertising makes us smoke and drink and eat more) and that is where the real problem is. Why blame yourself when you can blame someone else? You can buy a stomach machine for the same price as a packet of fags but if there is no will to be slimmer and fitter (and enjoy a longer and healthier life) then it will just attract cobwebs along with all the clothes you used to be able to wear and of course will be able to wear again one day!!!!!!

And agree that the best way is to educate and inform and give people all the tools they need to live a healthy life and then stop spending tens of £billions on lifestyle related illnesses, injuries and disabilities (obesity, most of the type 2 diabetes cases which could be prevented, delayed or at the very least better controlled with basic lifestyle changes, making hospital beds and ambulances bigger and stronger etc) and we might stand a chance. Healthy food is no more expensive, it just means shopping around and making time to prepare it. And if your argument is that you cant afford it or have the time then the answer is easy, just put less on your plates, that really is simple!

But when it seems to be becoming more acceptable to be fat, with celebrities even encouraging people not to worry about being fat but how to hide it and dress to cover it up, I am not sure that is going to happen anytime soon.

Not good for Swindon, the butt of so many jokes, once the capital of teen pregnancies and now of obesity, it is hard to be proud of the town. (cue all the idiots, why don't you leave etc!!!!!! er because my job is here my home is here my wifes job is here, family are here etc, prob the same reason you don't leave!).

Really don't expect anything to change though, the fat and lazy will still expect the fit and healthy to fund their lipo and gastric bands.
[quote][p][bold]swindonurock[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]NorthernWarrior[/bold] wrote: A joined up and efficient cycle network would be a start, so people can get out and do some sustained exercise. At the moment, even the much lauded Western Flyer is broken up with sections of road or rough path. If you want to go from West Swindon to Cricklade or beyond to South Cerney along the old railway track, you need to use the narrow (and dangerous) Tadpole Lane and Hayes Knoll at Blunsdon before you can rejoin the path. Not saying that's the only solution - the supermarkets also have a part to play, especially Asda who pile fattening snacks by the entrance at their West Swindon store while the fruit and veg section is poorly stocked with over-priced and nearly out of date produce.[/p][/quote]You really think that if Swindon invested in a cycle network and supermarkets altered their snack displays, etc, that it would make any difference? I think it would make zero difference. While your post is not entirely devoid of logic, neither of those suggestions would mean anything unless people's attitude towards their weight and health changed first. For whatever reason, people in Swindon (and elsewhere, of course) are simply ignoring the plentiful healthy-diet and exercise advise that is out there, and it's become not only socially acceptable, but the social norm, to be obese or overweight. People's attitude needs a radical overhaul, and I guess one of the best ways to start changing it is with a media-driven re-education drive. People need to learn the health risks of poor diet and lack of exercise and, more importantly, how to create a healthier lifestyle for themselves. There are lots of facilities in Swindon for all kinds of exercise - including walking along pavements instead of getting into the car or bus - just as there is healthy food available everywhere, but it's all pointless unless you change people's attitudes in the first instance. Given all of the corn-syrup, sugar, artificial sweeteners, colourings and flavourings, and other junk which often goes into food these days, (even much of the so-called healthy food) it can be a task to figure out how to change to a healthier diet, but it's certainly not impossible: in fact the easiest way is to simply buy as little processed food as possible (as it's almost all rubbish, despite what the packet may say) and to buy lots of fresh food i(fruit, vegetables, fresh fish and meat, etc), instead.[/p][/quote]Very good post indeed. Most things in todays world come down to attitude as attitudes drive behaviour, so with the wrong attitude all the cycle networks, free gyms and health food shops in the world won't end the obesity out there. Add to that the excuse and blame culture (supermarkets get us fat and drunk, fast food outlets make us fat and lazy, advertising makes us smoke and drink and eat more) and that is where the real problem is. Why blame yourself when you can blame someone else? You can buy a stomach machine for the same price as a packet of fags but if there is no will to be slimmer and fitter (and enjoy a longer and healthier life) then it will just attract cobwebs along with all the clothes you used to be able to wear and of course will be able to wear again one day!!!!!! And agree that the best way is to educate and inform and give people all the tools they need to live a healthy life and then stop spending tens of £billions on lifestyle related illnesses, injuries and disabilities (obesity, most of the type 2 diabetes cases which could be prevented, delayed or at the very least better controlled with basic lifestyle changes, making hospital beds and ambulances bigger and stronger etc) and we might stand a chance. Healthy food is no more expensive, it just means shopping around and making time to prepare it. And if your argument is that you cant afford it or have the time then the answer is easy, just put less on your plates, that really is simple! But when it seems to be becoming more acceptable to be fat, with celebrities even encouraging people not to worry about being fat but how to hide it and dress to cover it up, I am not sure that is going to happen anytime soon. Not good for Swindon, the butt of so many jokes, once the capital of teen pregnancies and now of obesity, it is hard to be proud of the town. (cue all the idiots, why don't you leave etc!!!!!! er because my job is here my home is here my wifes job is here, family are here etc, prob the same reason you don't leave!). Really don't expect anything to change though, the fat and lazy will still expect the fit and healthy to fund their lipo and gastric bands. house on the hill
  • Score: 14

8:15am Sun 17 Aug 14

Ollie Dognacky says...

" Trouble is moronic cyclists still get in the way of cars and ignore cycle paths that are available already. "

I think you will find cyclists are perfectly entitled to use the roads, even if there is an excuse of a cycle path nearby.

Remember also that those "moronic cyclists" are people with families etc
" Trouble is moronic cyclists still get in the way of cars and ignore cycle paths that are available already. " I think you will find cyclists are perfectly entitled to use the roads, even if there is an excuse of a cycle path nearby. Remember also that those "moronic cyclists" are people with families etc Ollie Dognacky
  • Score: 12

9:43am Sun 17 Aug 14

Alan Bast*rd says...

Ollie Dognacky wrote:
" Trouble is moronic cyclists still get in the way of cars and ignore cycle paths that are available already. "

I think you will find cyclists are perfectly entitled to use the roads, even if there is an excuse of a cycle path nearby.

Remember also that those "moronic cyclists" are people with families etc
If a path is provided it should be used. Cyclists frequently cause problems by ignoring the path and blocking traffic needlessly. Oxford road and Dorgan way two prime examples. Their family situation is irrelevant. In fact they have a better chance of getting home safely to their families if they use the paths provided.
[quote][p][bold]Ollie Dognacky[/bold] wrote: " Trouble is moronic cyclists still get in the way of cars and ignore cycle paths that are available already. " I think you will find cyclists are perfectly entitled to use the roads, even if there is an excuse of a cycle path nearby. Remember also that those "moronic cyclists" are people with families etc[/p][/quote]If a path is provided it should be used. Cyclists frequently cause problems by ignoring the path and blocking traffic needlessly. Oxford road and Dorgan way two prime examples. Their family situation is irrelevant. In fact they have a better chance of getting home safely to their families if they use the paths provided. Alan Bast*rd
  • Score: -7

10:04am Sun 17 Aug 14

nobody says...

Alan Bast*rd wrote:
Ollie Dognacky wrote:
" Trouble is moronic cyclists still get in the way of cars and ignore cycle paths that are available already. "

I think you will find cyclists are perfectly entitled to use the roads, even if there is an excuse of a cycle path nearby.

Remember also that those "moronic cyclists" are people with families etc
If a path is provided it should be used. Cyclists frequently cause problems by ignoring the path and blocking traffic needlessly. Oxford road and Dorgan way two prime examples. Their family situation is irrelevant. In fact they have a better chance of getting home safely to their families if they use the paths provided.
If that were true why do the roads become less congested during school holidays?
The reason is fewer cars needlessly causing traffic problems.
Bicycles may cause a few seconds to be "lost" waiting behind them but cars cause the traffic jams.
There are too many private cars using the limited road space, only way to help with congestion is to encourage people out of their cars.
[quote][p][bold]Alan Bast*rd[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ollie Dognacky[/bold] wrote: " Trouble is moronic cyclists still get in the way of cars and ignore cycle paths that are available already. " I think you will find cyclists are perfectly entitled to use the roads, even if there is an excuse of a cycle path nearby. Remember also that those "moronic cyclists" are people with families etc[/p][/quote]If a path is provided it should be used. Cyclists frequently cause problems by ignoring the path and blocking traffic needlessly. Oxford road and Dorgan way two prime examples. Their family situation is irrelevant. In fact they have a better chance of getting home safely to their families if they use the paths provided.[/p][/quote]If that were true why do the roads become less congested during school holidays? The reason is fewer cars needlessly causing traffic problems. Bicycles may cause a few seconds to be "lost" waiting behind them but cars cause the traffic jams. There are too many private cars using the limited road space, only way to help with congestion is to encourage people out of their cars. nobody
  • Score: 7

10:13am Sun 17 Aug 14

Alan Bast*rd says...

nobody wrote:
Alan Bast*rd wrote:
Ollie Dognacky wrote:
" Trouble is moronic cyclists still get in the way of cars and ignore cycle paths that are available already. "

I think you will find cyclists are perfectly entitled to use the roads, even if there is an excuse of a cycle path nearby.

Remember also that those "moronic cyclists" are people with families etc
If a path is provided it should be used. Cyclists frequently cause problems by ignoring the path and blocking traffic needlessly. Oxford road and Dorgan way two prime examples. Their family situation is irrelevant. In fact they have a better chance of getting home safely to their families if they use the paths provided.
If that were true why do the roads become less congested during school holidays?
The reason is fewer cars needlessly causing traffic problems.
Bicycles may cause a few seconds to be "lost" waiting behind them but cars cause the traffic jams.
There are too many private cars using the limited road space, only way to help with congestion is to encourage people out of their cars.
I agree. Cyclists blocking cars is a seperate issue though. There is no need to ride on the road if there is a path provided.
[quote][p][bold]nobody[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Alan Bast*rd[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ollie Dognacky[/bold] wrote: " Trouble is moronic cyclists still get in the way of cars and ignore cycle paths that are available already. " I think you will find cyclists are perfectly entitled to use the roads, even if there is an excuse of a cycle path nearby. Remember also that those "moronic cyclists" are people with families etc[/p][/quote]If a path is provided it should be used. Cyclists frequently cause problems by ignoring the path and blocking traffic needlessly. Oxford road and Dorgan way two prime examples. Their family situation is irrelevant. In fact they have a better chance of getting home safely to their families if they use the paths provided.[/p][/quote]If that were true why do the roads become less congested during school holidays? The reason is fewer cars needlessly causing traffic problems. Bicycles may cause a few seconds to be "lost" waiting behind them but cars cause the traffic jams. There are too many private cars using the limited road space, only way to help with congestion is to encourage people out of their cars.[/p][/quote]I agree. Cyclists blocking cars is a seperate issue though. There is no need to ride on the road if there is a path provided. Alan Bast*rd
  • Score: 0

5:35pm Sun 17 Aug 14

bevee says...

I think everyone has good comments but may I just add .... that being big and also being in the health profession that not everyone has time for the gym or long walks some days I can go 5 to 6 days without a hot meal and when I do finally get
Home I am to tired to cook and end up eating a sandwich .... but who can always afford fresh fruit and veg ... I know I can't ... yes I eat the wrong things at times yes I could do with losing weight does it get me down yes ... but do you think people moaning about our weight is gonna help ??? But also i have 4 kids a house work full time and always there for my patients i pull my weight at everything i do ... i also have health problems that other people could have and not know about and this is why they are big ... my point is not all big people are lazy not all big people can put up with the righteous skinny people putting there nose in we are allowed a life of our own some big people have health problems and not all is due too being over weight ..DONT judge until you know why they are big !!!!!
I think everyone has good comments but may I just add .... that being big and also being in the health profession that not everyone has time for the gym or long walks some days I can go 5 to 6 days without a hot meal and when I do finally get Home I am to tired to cook and end up eating a sandwich .... but who can always afford fresh fruit and veg ... I know I can't ... yes I eat the wrong things at times yes I could do with losing weight does it get me down yes ... but do you think people moaning about our weight is gonna help ??? But also i have 4 kids a house work full time and always there for my patients i pull my weight at everything i do ... i also have health problems that other people could have and not know about and this is why they are big ... my point is not all big people are lazy not all big people can put up with the righteous skinny people putting there nose in we are allowed a life of our own some big people have health problems and not all is due too being over weight ..DONT judge until you know why they are big !!!!! bevee
  • Score: -1

6:39pm Sun 17 Aug 14

house on the hill says...

bevee wrote:
I think everyone has good comments but may I just add .... that being big and also being in the health profession that not everyone has time for the gym or long walks some days I can go 5 to 6 days without a hot meal and when I do finally get
Home I am to tired to cook and end up eating a sandwich .... but who can always afford fresh fruit and veg ... I know I can't ... yes I eat the wrong things at times yes I could do with losing weight does it get me down yes ... but do you think people moaning about our weight is gonna help ??? But also i have 4 kids a house work full time and always there for my patients i pull my weight at everything i do ... i also have health problems that other people could have and not know about and this is why they are big ... my point is not all big people are lazy not all big people can put up with the righteous skinny people putting there nose in we are allowed a life of our own some big people have health problems and not all is due too being over weight ..DONT judge until you know why they are big !!!!!
Very few are big because of things out of their control. As a health professional I am sure you are aware of the tens of £Billions being spent on the Nhs treating obesity and type 2 diabetes patients that could and should be used treating people who have less self inflicted illnesses, injuries and disabilities caused purely by their lifestyle. Maybe if your wife was refused the expensive breast cancer drugs that are too expensive to provide on the NHS as on the news last week in favour of a few gastric band operations you would think very differently.

You don't always need to eat healthy you just need to eat less. Obesity comes from taking in more calories than you need whether they are healthy ones or not, that's a common excuse from so many that they don't have the money or time to eat more healthily. So just eat less and save money as well! As a parent of 4 I would have expected you to be more of a role model for your kids (or less!) rather than joining the long list of excuse makers.

Just eat a little less and exercise a little more, it really is simple! But as I said before why take responsibility when you can blame other people or the usual "it's a free country" line with no consideration of who pays to deal with your inevitable consequences! Healthcare is not a bottomless pit and with people living longer we need to use the money in the best way possible not "wasting" it on those who can't be bothered to make the effort.
[quote][p][bold]bevee[/bold] wrote: I think everyone has good comments but may I just add .... that being big and also being in the health profession that not everyone has time for the gym or long walks some days I can go 5 to 6 days without a hot meal and when I do finally get Home I am to tired to cook and end up eating a sandwich .... but who can always afford fresh fruit and veg ... I know I can't ... yes I eat the wrong things at times yes I could do with losing weight does it get me down yes ... but do you think people moaning about our weight is gonna help ??? But also i have 4 kids a house work full time and always there for my patients i pull my weight at everything i do ... i also have health problems that other people could have and not know about and this is why they are big ... my point is not all big people are lazy not all big people can put up with the righteous skinny people putting there nose in we are allowed a life of our own some big people have health problems and not all is due too being over weight ..DONT judge until you know why they are big !!!!![/p][/quote]Very few are big because of things out of their control. As a health professional I am sure you are aware of the tens of £Billions being spent on the Nhs treating obesity and type 2 diabetes patients that could and should be used treating people who have less self inflicted illnesses, injuries and disabilities caused purely by their lifestyle. Maybe if your wife was refused the expensive breast cancer drugs that are too expensive to provide on the NHS as on the news last week in favour of a few gastric band operations you would think very differently. You don't always need to eat healthy you just need to eat less. Obesity comes from taking in more calories than you need whether they are healthy ones or not, that's a common excuse from so many that they don't have the money or time to eat more healthily. So just eat less and save money as well! As a parent of 4 I would have expected you to be more of a role model for your kids (or less!) rather than joining the long list of excuse makers. Just eat a little less and exercise a little more, it really is simple! But as I said before why take responsibility when you can blame other people or the usual "it's a free country" line with no consideration of who pays to deal with your inevitable consequences! Healthcare is not a bottomless pit and with people living longer we need to use the money in the best way possible not "wasting" it on those who can't be bothered to make the effort. house on the hill
  • Score: 4

6:56pm Sun 17 Aug 14

bevee says...

I blame no one for my weight my weight is my fault and my problem ... I have never asked for bypass nor will I .... diabetes can be controlled by diet not just medication. .. and weight is the only cause diabetes. . I am big yes I would rather have a salad than a macdonalds and I do eat salad more than junk food ... you can't judge like this when you don't know the person ..... my kids havethe best diet going ... They are not fat my daughter has to have a balanced diet as
she is under Dr Williamson for her arthritis and she is 21 but she is not classed as overweight and moves very well for her self so please don't bring my children into this ... This is not a slagging off me match ... I'm just saying for some people diet fresh fruit and veg is not always the first thing on yourlist
I blame no one for my weight my weight is my fault and my problem ... I have never asked for bypass nor will I .... diabetes can be controlled by diet not just medication. .. and weight is the only cause diabetes. . I am big yes I would rather have a salad than a macdonalds and I do eat salad more than junk food ... you can't judge like this when you don't know the person ..... my kids havethe best diet going ... They are not fat my daughter has to have a balanced diet as she is under Dr Williamson for her arthritis and she is 21 but she is not classed as overweight and moves very well for her self so please don't bring my children into this ... This is not a slagging off me match ... I'm just saying for some people diet fresh fruit and veg is not always the first thing on yourlist bevee
  • Score: -2

9:04pm Sun 17 Aug 14

Ollie Dognacky says...

🚲 There is absolutely no point in a cyclist stopping and starting, 🚲getting on and off of bits of pavement, when they are perfectly entitled to use roads.🚲
It's very poor driving to claim more rights to roads just because you're in a car 🚘
🚲 There is absolutely no point in a cyclist stopping and starting, 🚲getting on and off of bits of pavement, when they are perfectly entitled to use roads.🚲 It's very poor driving to claim more rights to roads just because you're in a car 🚘 Ollie Dognacky
  • Score: 8

10:26pm Sun 17 Aug 14

Alan Bast*rd says...

Ollie Dognacky wrote:
🚲 There is absolutely no point in a cyclist stopping and starting, 🚲getting on and off of bits of pavement, when they are perfectly entitled to use roads.🚲
It's very poor driving to claim more rights to roads just because you're in a car 🚘
Its poor cycling to use the road when a cycle path is provided. I use the paths when I'm on my bike. It's selfish to hold up other traffic when a path is available. If there isn't a path then fair enough.
[quote][p][bold]Ollie Dognacky[/bold] wrote: 🚲 There is absolutely no point in a cyclist stopping and starting, 🚲getting on and off of bits of pavement, when they are perfectly entitled to use roads.🚲 It's very poor driving to claim more rights to roads just because you're in a car 🚘[/p][/quote]Its poor cycling to use the road when a cycle path is provided. I use the paths when I'm on my bike. It's selfish to hold up other traffic when a path is available. If there isn't a path then fair enough. Alan Bast*rd
  • Score: -1

8:52am Mon 18 Aug 14

A.Baron-Cohen says...

To fight the flab we need to look at the elephant in the room.......people eat more than they should because they are greedy and lazy, there is no excuse for stuffing your face.
To fight the flab we need to look at the elephant in the room.......people eat more than they should because they are greedy and lazy, there is no excuse for stuffing your face. A.Baron-Cohen
  • Score: 0

10:34am Mon 18 Aug 14

NorthernWarrior says...

With regard to cycling, didn't intend to start a "them and us debate" vs motorists, in point of fact I drive as well as cycle and by no means a lycra clad/helmeted oaf (I wear teeshirt, jeans and a beanie hat)! The main point was cycling is a very efficient way of burning calories, a moderate bike ride will burn twice the calories in the same time as a moderate walk. Back in the late winter I was 14st 11lb and really struggling to make in-roads with food management and walking alone. Since buying a bike in the spring and using that instead of walking or occasionally for work instead of the car (when the Western Flyer isn't shut) have dropped to 13st 5lb. Still overweight, but a positive step in the right direction.

Obviously of no benefit to those who have no interest in losing weight (as indeed would be changng the marketing approach of the supermarkets), but my sentiments were aimed at those who *want* to lose weight but are struggling to find a balance in their current regime.
With regard to cycling, didn't intend to start a "them and us debate" vs motorists, in point of fact I drive as well as cycle and by no means a lycra clad/helmeted oaf (I wear teeshirt, jeans and a beanie hat)! The main point was cycling is a very efficient way of burning calories, a moderate bike ride will burn twice the calories in the same time as a moderate walk. Back in the late winter I was 14st 11lb and really struggling to make in-roads with food management and walking alone. Since buying a bike in the spring and using that instead of walking or occasionally for work instead of the car (when the Western Flyer isn't shut) have dropped to 13st 5lb. Still overweight, but a positive step in the right direction. Obviously of no benefit to those who have no interest in losing weight (as indeed would be changng the marketing approach of the supermarkets), but my sentiments were aimed at those who *want* to lose weight but are struggling to find a balance in their current regime. NorthernWarrior
  • Score: 9

10:59am Mon 18 Aug 14

nobody says...

Alan Bast*rd wrote:
Ollie Dognacky wrote:
🚲 There is absolutely no point in a cyclist stopping and starting, 🚲getting on and off of bits of pavement, when they are perfectly entitled to use roads.🚲
It's very poor driving to claim more rights to roads just because you're in a car 🚘
Its poor cycling to use the road when a cycle path is provided. I use the paths when I'm on my bike. It's selfish to hold up other traffic when a path is available. If there isn't a path then fair enough.
No it's not, it's poor cycling to use a shared path if you are cycling more than 15mph, I personally say more than 10mph is too fast for a shared path.
Hence cyclists use the public highway as recommended by the DfT.
[quote][p][bold]Alan Bast*rd[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ollie Dognacky[/bold] wrote: 🚲 There is absolutely no point in a cyclist stopping and starting, 🚲getting on and off of bits of pavement, when they are perfectly entitled to use roads.🚲 It's very poor driving to claim more rights to roads just because you're in a car 🚘[/p][/quote]Its poor cycling to use the road when a cycle path is provided. I use the paths when I'm on my bike. It's selfish to hold up other traffic when a path is available. If there isn't a path then fair enough.[/p][/quote]No it's not, it's poor cycling to use a shared path if you are cycling more than 15mph, I personally say more than 10mph is too fast for a shared path. Hence cyclists use the public highway as recommended by the DfT. nobody
  • Score: 8

3:25pm Mon 18 Aug 14

Badgersgetabadname says...

I cycle allot and wouldnt dream of being on a pavement, the speed and momentum involved could and would seriously injure someone. I have a very vivid memory of an older gentleman being very upset with me for cycling on Commercial rd pavement I was about 11 or 12. Since then I have always used the road.

A quick look at food businesses that do well in the town is telling pizza, greggs, iceland foods loaded with salt or butter tells us people are not eating a healthy mix.
Buying healthy food and cooking in bulk is easy done no matter how busy your working week. Make meals and freeze them. I would find it hard to believe that someone does not have 4 hours once a week to ensure proper dinners are available for a week. Porridge etc in the morning takes minutes lunches can be made in advance pasta salads...Surely it is a question of time management and priorities.

According to the NHS obesity happens when we eat to much and exercise to little but like drinking too much or drug use this doesnt really address the root causes. Lazy etc are by products of whatever the causes actually are but is this a different point or is it?

Pushing cyclist onto pavements will cause more problems than it solves and is not an answer. A better question could be why do normally sensible well mannered people get into cars and become aggressive lunatics?
I cycle allot and wouldnt dream of being on a pavement, the speed and momentum involved could and would seriously injure someone. I have a very vivid memory of an older gentleman being very upset with me for cycling on Commercial rd pavement I was about 11 or 12. Since then I have always used the road. A quick look at food businesses that do well in the town is telling pizza, greggs, iceland foods loaded with salt or butter tells us people are not eating a healthy mix. Buying healthy food and cooking in bulk is easy done no matter how busy your working week. Make meals and freeze them. I would find it hard to believe that someone does not have 4 hours once a week to ensure proper dinners are available for a week. Porridge etc in the morning takes minutes lunches can be made in advance pasta salads...Surely it is a question of time management and priorities. According to the NHS obesity happens when we eat to much and exercise to little but like drinking too much or drug use this doesnt really address the root causes. Lazy etc are by products of whatever the causes actually are but is this a different point or is it? Pushing cyclist onto pavements will cause more problems than it solves and is not an answer. A better question could be why do normally sensible well mannered people get into cars and become aggressive lunatics? Badgersgetabadname
  • Score: 10

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