Teachers' fury at school budget cuts

SCHOOLS in some of Swindon’s poorest areas have reacted with shock and anger after having hundreds of thousands of pounds slashed from their budgets.

The cuts will lead to redundancies, adversely affect students and staff and ruin years of progress improving standards, one headteacher said yesterday.

Nova Hreod will be the biggest loser with £338,947 slashed from funding intended to help pupils in the most deprived areas.

Churchfields Academy will lose out by £281,520 and Dorcan Technology College by £166,025.

Funding to Isambard Community School will increase by £238.652, Kingsdown by £227,428 and Commonweal by £197,017.

Churchfields headteacher Steve Flavin yesterday led a vociferous attack on the plans.

He said: “In the simplest terms, these proposals amount to taking money from the poor and giving it to the rich and reminds me of the Sheriff of Nottingham in Robin Hood.

“I have a simple question and no one as yet can justify it. What can possibly justify removing £281,520 from Churchfields and effectively giving it to another secondary school down the road which doesn’t need it? I have compared the need based on free school meals and the Government’s measure of deprivation and if anything Churchfields should be getting more funding, not less.”

Churchfields’ overall budget for next year is £5.5m, which doesn’t include the £281,520 it stands to lose.

The school has the highest indicator of deprivation in the borough, with more than 40 per cent of students entitled to free school meals.

Additional funding is credited with a dramatic increase in the quality of teaching, outstanding exam results and a positive Ofsted inspection.

But under a new regime planned for September, Government grants will be channeled into an overall fund to be shared between all schools and academies.

The change, affecting the standards fund, ministerial priority and specialist schools grants, is intended to simplify a complicated allocation system.

Cash will be made available to all schools through the dedicated schools grant, based on a formula worked out by pupil numbers.

But critics say Swindon’s Schools Forum, an independent funding body, did not need to drastically vary amounts allocated to individual schools. They also question why there is only one member on the forum representing academies.

Mr Flavin said: “The local authority argue that what they are proposing is a fairer system in order to justify their actions and attract support. This doesn’t wash with me. How can it be fair to remove significant sums of funding from schools such as Churchfields which are serving some of the most needy children in our community and redistribute it to schools which do not have anything like the same characteristics of deprivations and need? It’s wrong.”

The schools standing to lose out warn they face huge deficits, despite some transitional funding being made available for the first year.

Mr Flavin said: “In the case of Churchfields this will inevitably lead to redundancies which will undermine the quality of education we seek to provide and hamper our progress towards becoming an outstanding academy.”

Churchfields still receives the Pupil Premium, aimed at raising students’ educational standards and life chances. But the £100,000 yearly sum will be far outweighed by the cuts.

Nova Hreod headteacher Julie Tridgell also reacted with shock.

She said: “Nova Hreod is devastated by the loss of funding. Every penny is precious in terms of increasing the quality of what you provide for young people.”

The Schools Forum voted on Tuesday to recommend the proposals to Swindon Council, which will ratify any change.

But opposition mounted yesterday, with the Labour group also joining the attack.

Leader Coun Jim Grant said: “I understand that the main purpose behind these funding changes is to simplify the funding system for schools, which I have no problem with.

“However the new system that has been devised has pretty much universally led to schools in the most deprived areas having their budgets cut, while schools in the more affluent areas are having their budgets increased.

“This will likely mean teachers being taken away from the schools in Swindon’s more deprived areas and moving to the schools in wealthier areas.

“To me, this goes against the values of social justice and social mobility. Some have said that increases in the Pupil Premium will mitigate the impact of these funding changes.

“However, I understand that the Pupil Premium wouldn’t fully mitigate the cuts being made to schools in some of Swindon’s more deprived areas and all schools receive the Pupil Premium, albeit different amounts.” The council will provide £600,000 in one-off transitional support funding to minimise the losses of the schools worst affected by the changes.

A Swindon Council spokesman said: “The budgets for schools are largely based on their pupil numbers although some grants are currently only available to certain schools.

“The coalition Government has, however, put all separate grants into one single pot and asked local authorities to distribute the money to schools based on locally determined needs via a fair funding formula.

“The Schools Forum approved the new local funding formula, following consultation with Headteacher Associations, and the formula is now fairer, simpler and easier to understand.

“As a result, instead of some funding being allocated to certain schools based on historic factors, all funding will be redistributed to all schools according to the number of pupils and their needs.

This approach is in line with the Government’s method of distributing the new Pupil Premium which is allocated to every school based on the needs of their pupils.

“The Schools Forum is committed to the equitable distribution of funding to schools, ensuring that all pupils benefit from the maximum available resources, regardless of the school they attend.”

All schools receive a separate source of funding from central Government, the Pupil Premium, which is designed to provide additional support to pupils eligible for free school meals; with a parent in the armed forces or looked after by the local authority.

The budget allocated to individual schools for 2012 to 2013 amounts to £122.4m - a year on year increase of 3.4 per cent.

The Pupil Premium brings in an additional £3.7m – a year on year increase of 97 per cent.

The Schools Forum advises the local authority on all aspects of school finance. Its membership includes Head Teachers, Governors and Union representatives.

Comments (22)

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10:04am Sat 10 Mar 12

Hmmmf says...

I'm afraid I don't understand all the socialist ranting about "deprivation and need." Deprived of what? In need of what?
.
According to the article, budgets have actually increased. The pie is getting bigger, but certain schools will receive a smaller slice of the pie than perhaps they hoped. Maybe it's because the new system is based on actual pupil numbers, and not 'percentile deprivation indicators'?
.
Where's the Fury?
I'm afraid I don't understand all the socialist ranting about "deprivation and need." Deprived of what? In need of what? . According to the article, budgets have actually increased. The pie is getting bigger, but certain schools will receive a smaller slice of the pie than perhaps they hoped. Maybe it's because the new system is based on actual pupil numbers, and not 'percentile deprivation indicators'? . Where's the Fury? Hmmmf
  • Score: 0

10:40am Sat 10 Mar 12

Robh says...

It is a case that for years they have been robbing the rich to give to the poor with the good schools getting less while the lesser got more.

How long before a lesser school becomes a good school and vice versa??
It is a case that for years they have been robbing the rich to give to the poor with the good schools getting less while the lesser got more. How long before a lesser school becomes a good school and vice versa?? Robh
  • Score: 0

5:03pm Sat 10 Mar 12

localboy88 says...

nut job mike says 'give us the money to do what the council already do' instead of investing in eductation
nut job mike says 'give us the money to do what the council already do' instead of investing in eductation localboy88
  • Score: 0

7:18pm Sat 10 Mar 12

Angry Swindon says...

Hmmmf quite naive there. Do you understand the concept of inflation firstly. The amount of cash may be more but its worth less. Secondly. The money is real cuts to the budgets of these schools do you not listen to headmasters comments or were they conveniently ignored. This entire mess was created through no fault of the schools or its students so why are they to suffer for a crisis that is happening not justy in this region but globally. Take a look at valencia news recently. Schools there cannot afford the heating when protested against the police got violent. I ask you all to look outside of Swindon what is happening and it will give you an idea of whats happening. Very small minded comments from people that are il informed. Put down the Adver and find out for your self.
Hmmmf quite naive there. Do you understand the concept of inflation firstly. The amount of cash may be more but its worth less. Secondly. The money is real cuts to the budgets of these schools do you not listen to headmasters comments or were they conveniently ignored. This entire mess was created through no fault of the schools or its students so why are they to suffer for a crisis that is happening not justy in this region but globally. Take a look at valencia news recently. Schools there cannot afford the heating when protested against the police got violent. I ask you all to look outside of Swindon what is happening and it will give you an idea of whats happening. Very small minded comments from people that are il informed. Put down the Adver and find out for your self. Angry Swindon
  • Score: 0

8:28pm Sat 10 Mar 12

Hmmmf says...

@Angry Swindon.
Did you actually read the article? And what on earth have Spanish schools got to do with Swindon?
@Angry Swindon. Did you actually read the article? And what on earth have Spanish schools got to do with Swindon? Hmmmf
  • Score: 0

9:59pm Sat 10 Mar 12

Angry Swindon says...

Hmmmf I do believe I did read the article. Thank you checking. I used Valencia as an example governments not having the money to fund the schools and making cuts yet we can prop up financial institutions at the drop of a hat. I did ask you to read up for yourself and come to your own conclusions instead of me highlighting too you. Global events from Finance to Geopolitics are very much everything to do with Swindon and its schools I feel. Whether its indirect consequences or direct.
Hmmmf I do believe I did read the article. Thank you checking. I used Valencia as an example governments not having the money to fund the schools and making cuts yet we can prop up financial institutions at the drop of a hat. I did ask you to read up for yourself and come to your own conclusions instead of me highlighting too you. Global events from Finance to Geopolitics are very much everything to do with Swindon and its schools I feel. Whether its indirect consequences or direct. Angry Swindon
  • Score: 0

7:29am Sun 11 Mar 12

Just another number says...

What some fail to realise is that it takes more time, effort, and resources to educate a student from a deprived area and even then that student may still fail to achieve what a student of similar potential from an affluent area would achieve.

There is a distinct difference in the motivation, behaviour, and abilities of students from deprived areas. Whilst there are always exceptions, education isn't as valued, their expectations aren't as high, they have less respect for themselves, the school, and their teachers, they lack long term aspirations, it's far less likely that their parents will take a positive role in their education, and they often have difficult circumstances at home as well.

The school has to try to make up for those differences and try to help those students achieve their potential. That takes more than just good teachers and dedicated support staff who are willing to work beyond their paid hours and beyond the expectations of their role, it also takes more in terms of resources, outside support, and facilities.

The funding needed to make a difference for students from deprived areas has just been taken away from some of the schools in Swindon that need it the most. So, yes, there is a reason for 'fury' and it should come from the areas and families served by these schools as well as the head teachers because they are losing out as well.
What some fail to realise is that it takes more time, effort, and resources to educate a student from a deprived area and even then that student may still fail to achieve what a student of similar potential from an affluent area would achieve. There is a distinct difference in the motivation, behaviour, and abilities of students from deprived areas. Whilst there are always exceptions, education isn't as valued, their expectations aren't as high, they have less respect for themselves, the school, and their teachers, they lack long term aspirations, it's far less likely that their parents will take a positive role in their education, and they often have difficult circumstances at home as well. The school has to try to make up for those differences and try to help those students achieve their potential. That takes more than just good teachers and dedicated support staff who are willing to work beyond their paid hours and beyond the expectations of their role, it also takes more in terms of resources, outside support, and facilities. The funding needed to make a difference for students from deprived areas has just been taken away from some of the schools in Swindon that need it the most. So, yes, there is a reason for 'fury' and it should come from the areas and families served by these schools as well as the head teachers because they are losing out as well. Just another number
  • Score: 0

9:56am Sun 11 Mar 12

Robh says...

It does take more effort to teach kids from deprived areas but only if we still try to make silk purses from sows ears.

Not every child can be an academic and whilst the system insists on academic targets it will be hard work for some. There should be far more practical subjects available. I'm sure that many parents and employers would like to see more kids with a practical rather than academic skills.
It does take more effort to teach kids from deprived areas but only if we still try to make silk purses from sows ears. Not every child can be an academic and whilst the system insists on academic targets it will be hard work for some. There should be far more practical subjects available. I'm sure that many parents and employers would like to see more kids with a practical rather than academic skills. Robh
  • Score: 0

10:50am Sun 11 Mar 12

Always Grumpy says...

Just another number wrote:
What some fail to realise is that it takes more time, effort, and resources to educate a student from a deprived area and even then that student may still fail to achieve what a student of similar potential from an affluent area would achieve.

There is a distinct difference in the motivation, behaviour, and abilities of students from deprived areas. Whilst there are always exceptions, education isn't as valued, their expectations aren't as high, they have less respect for themselves, the school, and their teachers, they lack long term aspirations, it's far less likely that their parents will take a positive role in their education, and they often have difficult circumstances at home as well.

The school has to try to make up for those differences and try to help those students achieve their potential. That takes more than just good teachers and dedicated support staff who are willing to work beyond their paid hours and beyond the expectations of their role, it also takes more in terms of resources, outside support, and facilities.

The funding needed to make a difference for students from deprived areas has just been taken away from some of the schools in Swindon that need it the most. So, yes, there is a reason for 'fury' and it should come from the areas and families served by these schools as well as the head teachers because they are losing out as well.
Expert on school funding and education now? Usual load of self opinated twaddle as usual.
Are you ever going to comment on an article that isn't your own, ill informed and politically biased opinion? No, thought not.
[quote][p][bold]Just another number[/bold] wrote: What some fail to realise is that it takes more time, effort, and resources to educate a student from a deprived area and even then that student may still fail to achieve what a student of similar potential from an affluent area would achieve. There is a distinct difference in the motivation, behaviour, and abilities of students from deprived areas. Whilst there are always exceptions, education isn't as valued, their expectations aren't as high, they have less respect for themselves, the school, and their teachers, they lack long term aspirations, it's far less likely that their parents will take a positive role in their education, and they often have difficult circumstances at home as well. The school has to try to make up for those differences and try to help those students achieve their potential. That takes more than just good teachers and dedicated support staff who are willing to work beyond their paid hours and beyond the expectations of their role, it also takes more in terms of resources, outside support, and facilities. The funding needed to make a difference for students from deprived areas has just been taken away from some of the schools in Swindon that need it the most. So, yes, there is a reason for 'fury' and it should come from the areas and families served by these schools as well as the head teachers because they are losing out as well.[/p][/quote]Expert on school funding and education now? Usual load of self opinated twaddle as usual. Are you ever going to comment on an article that isn't your own, ill informed and politically biased opinion? No, thought not. Always Grumpy
  • Score: 0

11:32am Sun 11 Mar 12

Just another number says...

Always Grumpy, thank you for providing yet another example of trolling.

However, this is a news story about education and school funding. Do you have anything to contribute on that topic, or are you just here to try to selfishly detract from what is an important local issue?
Always Grumpy, thank you for providing yet another example of trolling. However, this is a news story about education and school funding. Do you have anything to contribute on that topic, or are you just here to try to selfishly detract from what is an important local issue? Just another number
  • Score: 0

12:27pm Sun 11 Mar 12

Hmmmf says...

Again I'll ask: Deprived of what?
.
Also note that funds are now being allocated on real pupil numbers. In the past, a school with "40 per cent of students entitled to free school meals" had 'the highest indicator of deprivations.'
.
However if that school only had 100 pupils the reality is that only 40 of them qualified for FSM and the pupil premium; while at the same time a school with only a 20 per cent "deprivation indicator" may actually have had 1000 pupils and thus 200 qualifying for FSM (ie five times as many). Under the new system, funds are allocated on real pupil numbers, not some made-up statistical 'indicator' which is worthless until you know the real numbers involved.
Again I'll ask: Deprived of what? . Also note that funds are now being allocated on real pupil numbers. In the past, a school with "40 per cent of students entitled to free school meals" had 'the highest indicator of deprivations.' . However if that school only had 100 pupils the reality is that only 40 of them qualified for FSM and the pupil premium; while at the same time a school with only a 20 per cent "deprivation indicator" may actually have had 1000 pupils and thus 200 qualifying for FSM (ie five times as many). Under the new system, funds are allocated on real pupil numbers, not some made-up statistical 'indicator' which is worthless until you know the real numbers involved. Hmmmf
  • Score: 0

12:35pm Sun 11 Mar 12

Angry Swindon says...

People say you can vote. But when you have apathy in your voting system you end up with what we have got. NHS look into the vested interests of conservative MP's who will financially gain from contracts from the NHS if you need a link I can provide for you. Lets see if you can find it on your own though. This is not about choices we have its about choices we have not. What will it take a former Banker to be in charge of UK politics as demanded of Italy and Greece from the EU. Or maybe we have them already. Check out Obama's Office staff from Goldman Sachs if you want to know who rules us all. Please do not accpet what you are told in your local fluffy newspapers no can afford apathy at this time. Check out this link and tell me if you have hope for the NHS. http://socialinvesti
gations.blogspot.com
/2012/02/nhs-privati
sation-compilation-o
f.html

http://bengoldacre.p
osterous.com/who-is-
and-is-not-invited-t
o-camerons-emergen

This is about our schools, our NHS and our childrens future
People say you can vote. But when you have apathy in your voting system you end up with what we have got. NHS look into the vested interests of conservative MP's who will financially gain from contracts from the NHS if you need a link I can provide for you. Lets see if you can find it on your own though. This is not about choices we have its about choices we have not. What will it take a former Banker to be in charge of UK politics as demanded of Italy and Greece from the EU. Or maybe we have them already. Check out Obama's Office staff from Goldman Sachs if you want to know who rules us all. Please do not accpet what you are told in your local fluffy newspapers no can afford apathy at this time. Check out this link and tell me if you have hope for the NHS. http://socialinvesti gations.blogspot.com /2012/02/nhs-privati sation-compilation-o f.html http://bengoldacre.p osterous.com/who-is- and-is-not-invited-t o-camerons-emergen This is about our schools, our NHS and our childrens future Angry Swindon
  • Score: 0

1:18pm Sun 11 Mar 12

Just another number says...

Hmmmf, one of the best sources of local demographical data are the Acorn maps. However there are many other reliable sources. It's not 'made up', it's real, and the effects of deprivation have been documented and studied for generations.

As for what deprivation means to a child, it's not about just those students who qualify for free school meals. Even something as simple as not having books or a computer in the home can put a child at a disadvantage in school. Being kept from activities or social situations can also put a child behind, as can poor diet, lack of exercise, inconsistent or inappropriate discipline, being exposed to anti-social behaviour, physical and psychological abuse and neglect, coming from a broken home or single parent home, being in care, being from a low income home, being a young carer, the list is extensive and many young people are affected by several factors.

What do you tell a student from a deprived area who has working hard and is trying to achieve but can no longer be provided with any extra help because funding is no longer available?

If the government is trying to make sure that the poor get poorer they've just taken another big step towards that goal.
Hmmmf, one of the best sources of local demographical data are the Acorn maps. However there are many other reliable sources. It's not 'made up', it's real, and the effects of deprivation have been documented and studied for generations. As for what deprivation means to a child, it's not about just those students who qualify for free school meals. Even something as simple as not having books or a computer in the home can put a child at a disadvantage in school. Being kept from activities or social situations can also put a child behind, as can poor diet, lack of exercise, inconsistent or inappropriate discipline, being exposed to anti-social behaviour, physical and psychological abuse and neglect, coming from a broken home or single parent home, being in care, being from a low income home, being a young carer, the list is extensive and many young people are affected by several factors. What do you tell a student from a deprived area who has working hard and is trying to achieve but can no longer be provided with any extra help because funding is no longer available? If the government is trying to make sure that the poor get poorer they've just taken another big step towards that goal. Just another number
  • Score: 0

2:24pm Sun 11 Mar 12

Angry Swindon says...

Instead of cuts to schools how about we get this money back given away by one civil servant huh >>>>>>>

http://www.guardian.
co.uk/money/2011/dec
/06/hmrc-tax-deal-vo
dafone

This highlights a massive can of worms for which the Civil Servant in question is gracefully leaving post this year.

Guess the most wined dined civil servant in the administrations you guessed it the head of HMRC
Instead of cuts to schools how about we get this money back given away by one civil servant huh >>>>>>> http://www.guardian. co.uk/money/2011/dec /06/hmrc-tax-deal-vo dafone This highlights a massive can of worms for which the Civil Servant in question is gracefully leaving post this year. Guess the most wined dined civil servant in the administrations you guessed it the head of HMRC Angry Swindon
  • Score: 0

8:12pm Sun 11 Mar 12

Robh says...

Mr Flavin said: “In the case of Churchfields this will inevitably lead to redundancies which will undermine the quality of education we seek to provide and hamper our progress towards becoming an outstanding academy.”

What is more important. Becoming an outstanding academy or providing a good quality education??
Mr Flavin said: “In the case of Churchfields this will inevitably lead to redundancies which will undermine the quality of education we seek to provide and hamper our progress towards becoming an outstanding academy.” What is more important. Becoming an outstanding academy or providing a good quality education?? Robh
  • Score: 0

1:00am Mon 12 Mar 12

Just another number says...

Always Grumpy - thank you for providing yet another example of stalking and trolling.

However, this is a news story about education and school funding. Do you have anything to contribute on that topic, or are you still only here to try to selfishly detract from an important local issue?
Always Grumpy - thank you for providing yet another example of stalking and trolling. However, this is a news story about education and school funding. Do you have anything to contribute on that topic, or are you still only here to try to selfishly detract from an important local issue? Just another number
  • Score: 0

1:14am Mon 12 Mar 12

Just another number says...

Robh wrote:
Mr Flavin said: “In the case of Churchfields this will inevitably lead to redundancies which will undermine the quality of education we seek to provide and hamper our progress towards becoming an outstanding academy.”

What is more important. Becoming an outstanding academy or providing a good quality education??
Either way it will be the students who will lose. Becoming an outstanding school or academy and providing a good quality education are essentially the same goals.
[quote][p][bold]Robh[/bold] wrote: Mr Flavin said: “In the case of Churchfields this will inevitably lead to redundancies which will undermine the quality of education we seek to provide and hamper our progress towards becoming an outstanding academy.” What is more important. Becoming an outstanding academy or providing a good quality education??[/p][/quote]Either way it will be the students who will lose. Becoming an outstanding school or academy and providing a good quality education are essentially the same goals. Just another number
  • Score: 0

1:56pm Tue 13 Mar 12

Always Grumpy says...

Just another number wrote:
Robh wrote:
Mr Flavin said: “In the case of Churchfields this will inevitably lead to redundancies which will undermine the quality of education we seek to provide and hamper our progress towards becoming an outstanding academy.”

What is more important. Becoming an outstanding academy or providing a good quality education??
Either way it will be the students who will lose. Becoming an outstanding school or academy and providing a good quality education are essentially the same goals.
Just another number/moron - still poring out your boring, self opinionated rubbish and pretending to be the expert on everything. Well muppet, you're an expert on nothing - never have been and never will be.
[quote][p][bold]Just another number[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Robh[/bold] wrote: Mr Flavin said: “In the case of Churchfields this will inevitably lead to redundancies which will undermine the quality of education we seek to provide and hamper our progress towards becoming an outstanding academy.” What is more important. Becoming an outstanding academy or providing a good quality education??[/p][/quote]Either way it will be the students who will lose. Becoming an outstanding school or academy and providing a good quality education are essentially the same goals.[/p][/quote]Just another number/moron - still poring out your boring, self opinionated rubbish and pretending to be the expert on everything. Well muppet, you're an expert on nothing - never have been and never will be. Always Grumpy
  • Score: 0

6:16am Thu 15 Mar 12

Just another number says...

Always Grumpy - thank you for providing yet another example of stalking, abuse, and malicious trolling.

However, this is a news story about education and school funding. Do you have anything to contribute on that topic, or are you still only here post abuse and try to selfishly detract from an important local issue?”
Always Grumpy - thank you for providing yet another example of stalking, abuse, and malicious trolling. However, this is a news story about education and school funding. Do you have anything to contribute on that topic, or are you still only here post abuse and try to selfishly detract from an important local issue?” Just another number
  • Score: 0

7:42am Thu 15 Mar 12

Always Grumpy says...

Just another number/moron - still reoeating your boring, self opinionated rubbish and pretending to be the expert on everything. Well muppet, you're an expert on nothing - never have been and never will be.
As to complaining about trolling and abuse - what a complete hypocrite you are. You really are such an obnoxious little man and I have nothing but complete loathing for the likes of you.
Just another number/moron - still reoeating your boring, self opinionated rubbish and pretending to be the expert on everything. Well muppet, you're an expert on nothing - never have been and never will be. As to complaining about trolling and abuse - what a complete hypocrite you are. You really are such an obnoxious little man and I have nothing but complete loathing for the likes of you. Always Grumpy
  • Score: 0

7:36pm Thu 15 Mar 12

Just another number says...

Always Grumpy - thank you for providing yet another example of stalking, abuse, and malicious trolling.

However, this is a news story about education and school funding. Do you have anything to contribute on that topic, or are you still only here to degrade yourself by posting abuse?
Always Grumpy - thank you for providing yet another example of stalking, abuse, and malicious trolling. However, this is a news story about education and school funding. Do you have anything to contribute on that topic, or are you still only here to degrade yourself by posting abuse? Just another number
  • Score: 0

8:58pm Thu 15 Mar 12

Always Grumpy says...

Just another number wrote:
Always Grumpy - thank you for providing yet another example of stalking, abuse, and malicious trolling.

However, this is a news story about education and school funding. Do you have anything to contribute on that topic, or are you still only here to degrade yourself by posting abuse?
Just another number/moron - still repeating your boring, self opinionated rubbish and pretending to be the expert on everything. Well muppet, you're an expert on nothing - never have been and never will be.
As to complaining about trolling and abuse - what a complete hypocrite you are. You really are such an obnoxious little man and I have nothing but complete loathing for the likes of you.
[quote][p][bold]Just another number[/bold] wrote: Always Grumpy - thank you for providing yet another example of stalking, abuse, and malicious trolling. However, this is a news story about education and school funding. Do you have anything to contribute on that topic, or are you still only here to degrade yourself by posting abuse?[/p][/quote]Just another number/moron - still repeating your boring, self opinionated rubbish and pretending to be the expert on everything. Well muppet, you're an expert on nothing - never have been and never will be. As to complaining about trolling and abuse - what a complete hypocrite you are. You really are such an obnoxious little man and I have nothing but complete loathing for the likes of you. Always Grumpy
  • Score: 0

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