Warning over C02 danger

Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service is warning householders of the importance of carbon monoxide detectors after five people were overcome by fumes at a house near Devizes.

The fire service were called to the house in Littleton Panell on October 30 by Great Western Ambulance Service who treated the five people affected by the fumes.

Fire fighters from Devizes used an Altair monitor to establish that there were very high levels of carbon monoxide in the house, due to a faulty Rayburn.

In October 2010 a family from Potterne were taken to hospital with carbon monoxide poisoning due to a suspected blocked flue.

Carbon monoxide is often referred to as a silent killer as it is colourless, tasteless and has no smell.

Watch manager Neil Chamberlain said: “Carbon monoxide is colourless, odourless and tasteless, but it is also extremely dangerous. Without a CO detector you have no way of knowing that you’re being poisoned until the damage is already being done. Carbon monoxide kills some 15 people every year, so it is vital that every possible care is taken. CO detectors can be bought in most supermarkets and DIY stores. They’re not expensive and they save lives.”

Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headaches or dizziness, breathless, nausea, loss of consciousness, tiredness, pains in the chest or stomach, erratic behaviour and visual problems.

For more, see www.carbonmonoxidesafety.org.uk

Comments (4)

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12:28pm Sun 18 Nov 12

Cyanide says...

Not worried about CO2.
Not worried about CO2. Cyanide
  • Score: 0

1:52pm Sun 18 Nov 12

yourvoice@unison-greatwestern.co.uk says...

"Cyanide" is right, the headline is incorrect. The warning is about CO not CO2.

The incorrect headline doesn't detract from the importance of the story, and Great Western Ambulance has a specialist team equipped with monitoring equipment which detects the levels of CO in a person's bloodstream. This team is automatically sent to any incident in the Wiltshire area if people are affected by CO poisoning.
"Cyanide" is right, the headline is incorrect. The warning is about CO not CO2. The incorrect headline doesn't detract from the importance of the story, and Great Western Ambulance has a specialist team equipped with monitoring equipment which detects the levels of CO in a person's bloodstream. This team is automatically sent to any incident in the Wiltshire area if people are affected by CO poisoning. yourvoice@unison-greatwestern.co.uk
  • Score: 0

10:15am Mon 19 Nov 12

Stephanie Trotter says...

Why is the headline not corrected from CO2 to CO?
Why is the headline not corrected from CO2 to CO? Stephanie Trotter
  • Score: 0

10:39am Mon 19 Nov 12

Grumpy of Calne. says...

Didn't the reporter do science at school! Get it right!
Didn't the reporter do science at school! Get it right! Grumpy of Calne.
  • Score: 0

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