Close working relationship between Chief Constable and Crime Commissioner is vital

This Is Wiltshire: Wiltshire Chief Constable Pat Geenty Wiltshire Chief Constable Pat Geenty

WILTSHIRE Police Chief Constable Patrick Geenty said a close working relationship between himself and the newly elected Police and Crime Commissioner was important.

Speaking this morning on BBC Wiltshire, Mr Geenty said that while he would strongly resist any political influence on his role, he and Angus MacPherson would be working closely together to deliver an effective police force on the budget available and keeping the people of Swindon and Wiltshire safe.

“I think the relationship is crucial,” he said.

“We must work together as a team for the public. We must listen to the priorities given to us.

“If we need to make policing changes then we will listen to what the Police and Crime Commissioner and public are saying.

“I think Angus will reflect the public voice well.

“I am not a politician and never will be. As Chief Constable I am responsible for operational policing and there will be no political influence on that.

“I think political interference is when someone tries to direct you to do, or not do, something based on political ideologies. I would resist that completely.

“Angus has published a manifesto and that will be delivered in policy policing, and he will hold me accountable on that.”

Mr Geenty told BBC Wiltshire that while the turnout was disappointing but beleived the point of the Police and Crime Commissioner role may not have been explained clearly enough.

“The whole point of the Police and Crime Commissioner is to give the public a vote.

“Clearly there has been a problem in communicating that and what the role is.

“This applies to some of my police officers too.”

The scrapping of the Police Authority means that there could be some extra money available in the budget, and Mr Geenty said he hoped it would be possible to spend this on extra police officers.

“Obviously I would like more trained, professional police officers and Wiltshire is curerently one of only a few forces who are recruiting.

“I think you also need to make more of specials, as well as tapping in to volunteer and community Streetwatch gorups.

“I think that is one role in which the new Police and Crime Commissioner can play an important part.”

He said he thought his staff had done a fantastic job in difficult times, but understood there could be some confusion at the new system.

“I can understand why some officers might be concerned and why the public could be concerned.

“That’s why the Police and Crime Commissioner and Chief Constable, of forces across the country, need to make sure they protect the public.

“That’s what I’m paid to do and that’s what I will do.”

Comments (8)

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1:12pm Fri 16 Nov 12

I 2 Could B says...

Mr Geenty is being rather disengenous here. Many of the decisions that a senior police officer takes will be political, whether they realise or accept it or not.

The way that manpower and resources are divided and allocated is a political decision. The way some criminals are let off/given 'warnings', while others are arrested, is a political decision.

With the exceptions of teachers, the police are the most politicised of all our public servants - and have been since the force was originated.

Even the manner in which police speak to and treat criminals is, ultimately, motivated and shaped by political outlook.

The entire system is overwhelmingly based around failed Left wing ideology: 'community service' non-punishments, unduly lenient custodial sentences, prisons where inmates break every rule published and nothing is done about it, etc... hopefully Mr MacPherson can reverse some of this failure during his period in office.

The public needs to see a return to criminals being treated like criminals, rather than 'clients' of the Criminal Justice System.
Mr Geenty is being rather disengenous here. Many of the decisions that a senior police officer takes will be political, whether they realise or accept it or not. [p] The way that manpower and resources are divided and allocated is a political decision. The way some criminals are let off/given 'warnings', while others are arrested, is a political decision. [p] With the exceptions of teachers, the police are the most politicised of all our public servants - and have been since the force was originated. [p] Even the manner in which police speak to and treat criminals is, ultimately, motivated and shaped by political outlook. [p] The entire system is overwhelmingly based around failed Left wing ideology: 'community service' non-punishments, unduly lenient custodial sentences, prisons where inmates break every rule published and nothing is done about it, etc... hopefully Mr MacPherson can reverse some of this failure during his period in office. [p] The public needs to see a return to criminals being treated like criminals, rather than 'clients' of the Criminal Justice System. I 2 Could B

1:24pm Fri 16 Nov 12

The Real Librarian says...

I 2 Could B says...
1:12pm Fri 16 Nov 12



Exactly!
I 2 Could B says... 1:12pm Fri 16 Nov 12 Exactly! The Real Librarian

1:41pm Fri 16 Nov 12

beetawix says...

In an another (uncommentable) article about Angus winning, he is quoted as knowing how the police work.

So do the police don't they?
In an another (uncommentable) article about Angus winning, he is quoted as knowing how the police work. So do the police don't they? beetawix

2:01pm Fri 16 Nov 12

I 2 Could B says...

beetawix wrote:
In an another (uncommentable) article about Angus winning, he is quoted as knowing how the police work. So do the police don't they?
You'd hope so. But that's also the problem - if it's left to the police police the police, we run into potential problems where they choose to hit the 'easy' targets (let's say, motorists, for example) that raise money while tending to shy away from the 'hard' targets (repeat violent criminals who are a pain to deal with).

The concept of having a non-policeman Commissioner is actually a good one, it *should* help to bridge the gap between what the public want the police to be doing and what the police themselves actually do.

Although, what happens if/when the police just do as they please and ignore the Commissioner, we've yet to discover.

Also, I am very interested as to how Mr MacPherson intends to find out what the public want the police to do. I hope he's not simply going to point at his election leaflet and say, 'I told you what I was going to do, and you voted for it, so here you go'.

It will also be VERY interesting to see how he intends to come good on his election promise to fight for tougher and more responsible sentencing in our courts.
[quote][p][bold]beetawix[/bold] wrote: In an another (uncommentable) article about Angus winning, he is quoted as knowing how the police work. So do the police don't they?[/p][/quote]You'd hope so. But that's also the problem - if it's left to the police police the police, we run into potential problems where they choose to hit the 'easy' targets (let's say, motorists, for example) that raise money while tending to shy away from the 'hard' targets (repeat violent criminals who are a pain to deal with). [p] The concept of having a non-policeman Commissioner is actually a good one, it *should* help to bridge the gap between what the public want the police to be doing and what the police themselves actually do. [p] Although, what happens if/when the police just do as they please and ignore the Commissioner, we've yet to discover. [p] Also, I am very interested as to how Mr MacPherson intends to find out what the public want the police to do. I hope he's not simply going to point at his election leaflet and say, 'I told you what I was going to do, and you voted for it, so here you go'. [p] It will also be VERY interesting to see how he intends to come good on his election promise to fight for tougher and more responsible sentencing in our courts. I 2 Could B

2:18pm Fri 16 Nov 12

The Real Librarian says...

"I 2 Could B says...
2:01pm Fri 16 Nov 12

It will also be VERY interesting to see how he intends to come good on his election promise to fight for tougher and more responsible sentencing in our courts."

Given that he has been a magistrate for years, I suspect this is the last thing on his mind.
"I 2 Could B says... 2:01pm Fri 16 Nov 12 It will also be VERY interesting to see how he intends to come good on his election promise to fight for tougher and more responsible sentencing in our courts." Given that he has been a magistrate for years, I suspect this is the last thing on his mind. The Real Librarian

2:22pm Fri 16 Nov 12

The Real Librarian says...

Interesting stats on the spolit ballots

1st Count

197 people voted for 2 first preference candidates
1 person wrote their name or other identifying mark
180 people didn’t include a first preference
306 void because it was impossible to tell what they meant

2nd count
40 people voted for 2 second preference candidates
852 people didn’t put a second preference
57 void because it was impossible to tell what they meant
Interesting stats on the spolit ballots 1st Count 197 people voted for 2 first preference candidates 1 person wrote their name or other identifying mark 180 people didn’t include a first preference 306 void because it was impossible to tell what they meant 2nd count 40 people voted for 2 second preference candidates 852 people didn’t put a second preference 57 void because it was impossible to tell what they meant The Real Librarian

4:02pm Fri 16 Nov 12

I 2 Could B says...

The Real Librarian wrote:
"I 2 Could B says... 2:01pm Fri 16 Nov 12 It will also be VERY interesting to see how he intends to come good on his election promise to fight for tougher and more responsible sentencing in our courts." Given that he has been a magistrate for years, I suspect this is the last thing on his mind.
Indeed. That's what worries me most about Mr MacPherson, he does appear to be 'one of them'.

Incredibly, magistrates are often even more deluded and gullible in their sentencing than judges. Quite some achievement.
[quote][p][bold]The Real Librarian[/bold] wrote: "I 2 Could B says... 2:01pm Fri 16 Nov 12 It will also be VERY interesting to see how he intends to come good on his election promise to fight for tougher and more responsible sentencing in our courts." Given that he has been a magistrate for years, I suspect this is the last thing on his mind.[/p][/quote]Indeed. That's what worries me most about Mr MacPherson, he does appear to be 'one of them'. [p] Incredibly, magistrates are often even more deluded and gullible in their sentencing than judges. Quite some achievement. I 2 Could B

11:28pm Fri 16 Nov 12

beetawix says...

hey.' could B'. re
"But that's also the problem - if it's left to the police police the police, we run into potential problems where they choose to hit the 'easy'targets"

_________________
he also said he wasn't going to interfere with daily policing

difficult to see what he _is_ going to do.

a 15% turn out is more than a lack of interest. It means people don't want this and fail to see the point of it.
hey.' could B'. re "But that's also the problem - if it's left to the police police the police, we run into potential problems where they choose to hit the 'easy'targets" _________________ he also said he wasn't going to interfere with daily policing difficult to see what he _is_ going to do. a 15% turn out is more than a lack of interest. It means people don't want this and fail to see the point of it. beetawix

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