Coining it in for the heroes

This Is Wiltshire: Diane Powell, centre, of Help for Heroes, with, from left, metal detectors Terry Ely and Allan Ashford, Michael Whitehead, of Chisbury Lower Farm, and Richard Drew, of The Crown Estate Diane Powell, centre, of Help for Heroes, with, from left, metal detectors Terry Ely and Allan Ashford, Michael Whitehead, of Chisbury Lower Farm, and Richard Drew, of The Crown Estate

Metal detecting enthusiasts unearthed £2,000 for Armed Services charity Help for Heroes by scouring land in Marlborough for artefacts.

Over the past year the Wessex Metal Detecting Club has searched countryside opened by The Crown Estate for buried treasure.

Site officer Allan Ashford said: “Without the help of Angus Richards, managing agent for The Crown Estate, and the estate staff, none of this would have happened.

“Immense thanks must go to them for allowing us to continue detecting in 2013.”

Last year many historical items were uncovered, ranging from Roman brooches and coins to Victorian buckles and buttons.

Items of historical interest were all recorded on the Portable Antiquities Scheme database and members also donated a large array of finds to the local historical society. Malcolm Burns, The Crown Estate’s portfolio manager, said: “We were extremely happy to support the club over the past year.

“I would like to congratulate them on raising such a substantial sum for charity.”

Early last year the club decided to focus its fundraising efforts on Help for Heroes and thanks to The Crown Estate, which agreed to allow the club to hold events on its land at Marlborough, it made the £2,000 donation on February 8.

Bryn Parry, CEO and co-founder of the charity, said: “Help for Heroes is all about doing your bit and the clever idea to invite the Wessex Metal Detecting Club to hold a series of events, with the support of the Crown Estate commissioners, is a fantastic example of people having fun while raising money for a wonderful cause.”

Comments (1)

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9:46pm Tue 26 Feb 13

jezercalne says...

Why is the word heroes so overused these days? I expect some of the service men and women referred to fit this description, but the majority just sit out their term and receive a good salary and bonus without any risk to themselves. The MOD should surely undertake any statutory aftercare necessary, as is their legal duty, so why are charities like Help for Heroes required?
Why is the word heroes so overused these days? I expect some of the service men and women referred to fit this description, but the majority just sit out their term and receive a good salary and bonus without any risk to themselves. The MOD should surely undertake any statutory aftercare necessary, as is their legal duty, so why are charities like Help for Heroes required? jezercalne

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