We’re the fattest town, figures say

This Is Wiltshire: Swindon has more obese people than anywhere else in Wiltshire, Avon and Gloucester Swindon has more obese people than anywhere else in Wiltshire, Avon and Gloucester

SWINDON is the most obese town in Wiltshire, Avon and Gloucestershire according to new data from Public Health England.

Statistics published for the area by Public Health England yesterday revealed that 70 per cent of adults are overweight or obese, almost ten per cent more than people in the wider Wilt-shire area.

In England as a whole, 64 per cent of adults are overweight or obese.

Although the figures seem high, they have not come as a shock to Swindon Council.

Fiona Dickens, the public health programme manager at the council, said: “The figures seem big but they don’t come as a great surprise when you take into account the figures are self-reported.

“We are doing a lot to tackle obesity, especially in the young, and we have a Healthy Weight Strategy and an Action Plan.”

There is plenty of help out there for people who do want to lose the weight, with local groups like Slimming World on hand to help.

Slimming World Consultant and team developer in Swindon, Heather Zych, said: “It is shocking that three quarters of your friends and family are overweight or obese.

“But we’re out there to help people lose weight and tackle this problem.

“We had over 1,000 new members sign up in January and we are launching a campaign in February to try and help more people to lose weight healthily.

“It’s also not just about our members but also the influence beyond that. “Our members take what they learn and cook the meals at home, meaning more people are eating more healthily.”

People who are overweight or obese have a body mass index – a measure of an individual’s weight which accounts for their height – greater than 25.

Those with a BMI of 25 or greater have an increased risk of developing type two diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers and costing the NHS more than £5bn each year.

Being obese can also affect self-esteem and mental health.

Dr Shona Arora, Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire PHE Centre Director, said: “Public Health England is committed to helping tackle the levels of people who are overweight and obese in Avon, Gloucester-shire and Wiltshire by supporting our local authorities to develop a broad programme of action to reduce levels of excess weight.

“There is no silver bullet to reducing obesity. It is an issue that requires action at national, local, family and individual level. “Local authorities are ideally placed to develop co-ordinated action across their departments, services and partner organisations to tackle issues of overweight and obesity in the local population.

“This data will enable local councils to monitor progress towards the national ambition of achieving a downward trend in excess weight by 2020.”

To find out more about Slimming World or to find a slimming group near you, visit the www.slimmingworld.com.

Comments (52)

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8:07am Wed 5 Feb 14

Wildwestener says...

Finally we win something. Good Old Swindon
Finally we win something. Good Old Swindon Wildwestener

8:18am Wed 5 Feb 14

house on the hill says...

Who say's we aren't the best at anything here in Swindon then? Joking aside that is a pretty shocking statistic. I still do not believe that people are truly happy being obese and as for 95% it is purely down to lifestyle choice and that it doesn't happen overnight, it doesn't make sense that people would make a choice to be unhappy. And we aren't talking about those a couple of stone overweight who do a bit of exercise and have the odd drink and take away, this more about those 4 or 5 stone or more overweight who are choosing to put their health and life expectancy seriously at risk.

I am sure there will be those who say I am heartless, but look around. This softly softly, there there, it's not your fault and we will pay for all your treatment culture that we currently have, how is that working out then? Obesity on the rise, childhood obesity on the rise and cancer on the rise (50% of which could be avoided with lifestyle changes). Yes there is freedom of choice but I really don't believe people want to ruin their health and life expectancy and live on endless medication and get out of breath just walking upstairs and yet they do it in their millions.

Prevention is better than cure and we need better education, more responsible parenting and a harder approach to make people realise what they are doing to themselves and that at some stage the NHS simply wont be able to cope with the ever increasing numbers. And an end to the numerous excuses that so many will no doubt come up with on here.
Who say's we aren't the best at anything here in Swindon then? Joking aside that is a pretty shocking statistic. I still do not believe that people are truly happy being obese and as for 95% it is purely down to lifestyle choice and that it doesn't happen overnight, it doesn't make sense that people would make a choice to be unhappy. And we aren't talking about those a couple of stone overweight who do a bit of exercise and have the odd drink and take away, this more about those 4 or 5 stone or more overweight who are choosing to put their health and life expectancy seriously at risk. I am sure there will be those who say I am heartless, but look around. This softly softly, there there, it's not your fault and we will pay for all your treatment culture that we currently have, how is that working out then? Obesity on the rise, childhood obesity on the rise and cancer on the rise (50% of which could be avoided with lifestyle changes). Yes there is freedom of choice but I really don't believe people want to ruin their health and life expectancy and live on endless medication and get out of breath just walking upstairs and yet they do it in their millions. Prevention is better than cure and we need better education, more responsible parenting and a harder approach to make people realise what they are doing to themselves and that at some stage the NHS simply wont be able to cope with the ever increasing numbers. And an end to the numerous excuses that so many will no doubt come up with on here. house on the hill

8:38am Wed 5 Feb 14

ChannelX says...

I blame the Foodbanks.
I blame the Foodbanks. ChannelX

8:39am Wed 5 Feb 14

ChannelX says...

I wonder if the fact that 70 per cent of adults are overweight or obese in Swindon correlates to the recent article about the town also having higher than average levels of depression and suicide?
I wonder if the fact that 70 per cent of adults are overweight or obese in Swindon correlates to the recent article about the town also having higher than average levels of depression and suicide? ChannelX

8:42am Wed 5 Feb 14

swindondad says...

Whilst there can be little doubt that there are more "fat", “unfit” and “unhealthy” people now than in the past I find the medical professions obsession with BMI to be frankly "stupid".

BMI takes no account of body shape or type let alone body fat %.

As a challenge to anyone who thinks that the BMI is an accurate reflection as to the health / fitness level of an individual please just google the following world class athletes.

Dylan Young (BMI 32 Obese)
Rob Webber (BMI 33 Obese)
Tom Youngs (BMI 33 Obese)

Do any of these young men look fat / unfit / unhealthy to you? Come on now be honest.
Whilst there can be little doubt that there are more "fat", “unfit” and “unhealthy” people now than in the past I find the medical professions obsession with BMI to be frankly "stupid". BMI takes no account of body shape or type let alone body fat %. As a challenge to anyone who thinks that the BMI is an accurate reflection as to the health / fitness level of an individual please just google the following world class athletes. Dylan Young (BMI 32 Obese) Rob Webber (BMI 33 Obese) Tom Youngs (BMI 33 Obese) Do any of these young men look fat / unfit / unhealthy to you? Come on now be honest. swindondad

8:45am Wed 5 Feb 14

anotherimigrant says...

Dr Shona Arora, Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire PHE Centre Director, said: “Public Health England is committed to helping tackle the levels of people who are overweight and obese in Avon, Gloucester-shire and Wiltshire by supporting our local authorities to develop a broad programme of action to reduce levels of excess weight.

Clearly not working very well Shona is it.?

Don't suppose you could try something else.

Like changing your useless job title and telling the phat peeps not to eat so much and get some exercise.
Dr Shona Arora, Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire PHE Centre Director, said: “Public Health England is committed to helping tackle the levels of people who are overweight and obese in Avon, Gloucester-shire and Wiltshire by supporting our local authorities to develop a broad programme of action to reduce levels of excess weight. Clearly not working very well Shona is it.? Don't suppose you could try something else. Like changing your useless job title and telling the phat peeps not to eat so much and get some exercise. anotherimigrant

8:56am Wed 5 Feb 14

scottwichall says...

Sorry, I call BS on this set of "please keep funding us at our useless, left wing, hand waving, prod nosing, tax slurping quango" statistics.

To quote:
"Statistics published for the area by Public Health England yesterday revealed that 70 per cent of adults are overweight or obese, almost ten per cent more than people in the wider Wiltshire area."

That should read 70% of the adults WE HAVE FIGURES FOR.

Do they know what my weight is? No as I have not been weighed by any of the chancers with a god complex for 15 years. I suspect there are rather a large amount of people who they do not have figures for.

And funnily enough when I popped out to Coate Water a couple of Sundays ago as it was a glorious day, were 7 out of 10 people fat? No is the simple answer to that.

And my fundamentally flawed measurement known as the BMI is in the healthy weight range.
Sorry, I call BS on this set of "please keep funding us at our useless, left wing, hand waving, prod nosing, tax slurping quango" statistics. To quote: "Statistics published for the area by Public Health England yesterday revealed that 70 per cent of adults are overweight or obese, almost ten per cent more than people in the wider Wiltshire area." That should read 70% of the adults WE HAVE FIGURES FOR. Do they know what my weight is? No as I have not been weighed by any of the chancers with a god complex for 15 years. I suspect there are rather a large amount of people who they do not have figures for. And funnily enough when I popped out to Coate Water a couple of Sundays ago as it was a glorious day, were 7 out of 10 people fat? No is the simple answer to that. And my fundamentally flawed measurement known as the BMI is in the healthy weight range. scottwichall

9:08am Wed 5 Feb 14

GroundhogDay says...

I don't think the council have a clue how to tackle this issue. Flogging off all the council owned leisure centres is unlikely to help.

I don't think central government has a clue either though. Love him or loathe him, Jamie Olivers' school dinner campaign highlighted that politicians don't understand the importance of food education or nutrition.

Personally I don't think it's that difficult to tackle. Common sense policies and some regulation would do wonders.
I don't think the council have a clue how to tackle this issue. Flogging off all the council owned leisure centres is unlikely to help. I don't think central government has a clue either though. Love him or loathe him, Jamie Olivers' school dinner campaign highlighted that politicians don't understand the importance of food education or nutrition. Personally I don't think it's that difficult to tackle. Common sense policies and some regulation would do wonders. GroundhogDay

9:11am Wed 5 Feb 14

GroundhogDay says...

scottwichall wrote:
Sorry, I call BS on this set of "please keep funding us at our useless, left wing, hand waving, prod nosing, tax slurping quango" statistics.

To quote:
"Statistics published for the area by Public Health England yesterday revealed that 70 per cent of adults are overweight or obese, almost ten per cent more than people in the wider Wiltshire area."

That should read 70% of the adults WE HAVE FIGURES FOR.

Do they know what my weight is? No as I have not been weighed by any of the chancers with a god complex for 15 years. I suspect there are rather a large amount of people who they do not have figures for.

And funnily enough when I popped out to Coate Water a couple of Sundays ago as it was a glorious day, were 7 out of 10 people fat? No is the simple answer to that.

And my fundamentally flawed measurement known as the BMI is in the healthy weight range.
You may be correct but your Coate Water example is likely to be even less respresentative...

I expect the 10 out of 10 fat people needed to level out your analysis were sat on their sofas whilst you were enjoying Coate water.
[quote][p][bold]scottwichall[/bold] wrote: Sorry, I call BS on this set of "please keep funding us at our useless, left wing, hand waving, prod nosing, tax slurping quango" statistics. To quote: "Statistics published for the area by Public Health England yesterday revealed that 70 per cent of adults are overweight or obese, almost ten per cent more than people in the wider Wiltshire area." That should read 70% of the adults WE HAVE FIGURES FOR. Do they know what my weight is? No as I have not been weighed by any of the chancers with a god complex for 15 years. I suspect there are rather a large amount of people who they do not have figures for. And funnily enough when I popped out to Coate Water a couple of Sundays ago as it was a glorious day, were 7 out of 10 people fat? No is the simple answer to that. And my fundamentally flawed measurement known as the BMI is in the healthy weight range.[/p][/quote]You may be correct but your Coate Water example is likely to be even less respresentative... I expect the 10 out of 10 fat people needed to level out your analysis were sat on their sofas whilst you were enjoying Coate water. GroundhogDay

9:16am Wed 5 Feb 14

The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man says...

swindondad wrote:
Whilst there can be little doubt that there are more "fat", “unfit” and “unhealthy” people now than in the past I find the medical professions obsession with BMI to be frankly "stupid".

BMI takes no account of body shape or type let alone body fat %.

As a challenge to anyone who thinks that the BMI is an accurate reflection as to the health / fitness level of an individual please just google the following world class athletes.

Dylan Young (BMI 32 Obese)
Rob Webber (BMI 33 Obese)
Tom Youngs (BMI 33 Obese)

Do any of these young men look fat / unfit / unhealthy to you? Come on now be honest.
Wholeheartedly agree, yes, BMI is stupid.

Muscle is far denser than fat so someone that has a lot of muscle will have a high BMI. The BMI test is simply not fit for purpose for many many people.
[quote][p][bold]swindondad[/bold] wrote: Whilst there can be little doubt that there are more "fat", “unfit” and “unhealthy” people now than in the past I find the medical professions obsession with BMI to be frankly "stupid". BMI takes no account of body shape or type let alone body fat %. As a challenge to anyone who thinks that the BMI is an accurate reflection as to the health / fitness level of an individual please just google the following world class athletes. Dylan Young (BMI 32 Obese) Rob Webber (BMI 33 Obese) Tom Youngs (BMI 33 Obese) Do any of these young men look fat / unfit / unhealthy to you? Come on now be honest.[/p][/quote]Wholeheartedly agree, yes, BMI is stupid. Muscle is far denser than fat so someone that has a lot of muscle will have a high BMI. The BMI test is simply not fit for purpose for many many people. The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man

9:26am Wed 5 Feb 14

Hmmmf says...

I think we can expect more 'health strategy' and 'action plan' articles from the Adver on mental wellbeing, childhood immunisation, obesity and diabetes, and the other health 'areas' where Swindon has a red blob on page 4 of the chart shown here:

http://goo.gl/KWYXWh
I think we can expect more 'health strategy' and 'action plan' articles from the Adver on mental wellbeing, childhood immunisation, obesity and diabetes, and the other health 'areas' where Swindon has a red blob on page 4 of the chart shown here: http://goo.gl/KWYXWh Hmmmf

9:29am Wed 5 Feb 14

GroundhogDay says...

The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man wrote:
swindondad wrote:
Whilst there can be little doubt that there are more "fat", “unfit” and “unhealthy” people now than in the past I find the medical professions obsession with BMI to be frankly "stupid".

BMI takes no account of body shape or type let alone body fat %.

As a challenge to anyone who thinks that the BMI is an accurate reflection as to the health / fitness level of an individual please just google the following world class athletes.

Dylan Young (BMI 32 Obese)
Rob Webber (BMI 33 Obese)
Tom Youngs (BMI 33 Obese)

Do any of these young men look fat / unfit / unhealthy to you? Come on now be honest.
Wholeheartedly agree, yes, BMI is stupid.

Muscle is far denser than fat so someone that has a lot of muscle will have a high BMI. The BMI test is simply not fit for purpose for many many people.
I agree to a certain extent. BMI doesn't work for everybody - but I'm not sure many many people.... Most people aren't athletes or overly muscle bound. BMI is probably useful as a guide for the majority of the population.
[quote][p][bold]The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]swindondad[/bold] wrote: Whilst there can be little doubt that there are more "fat", “unfit” and “unhealthy” people now than in the past I find the medical professions obsession with BMI to be frankly "stupid". BMI takes no account of body shape or type let alone body fat %. As a challenge to anyone who thinks that the BMI is an accurate reflection as to the health / fitness level of an individual please just google the following world class athletes. Dylan Young (BMI 32 Obese) Rob Webber (BMI 33 Obese) Tom Youngs (BMI 33 Obese) Do any of these young men look fat / unfit / unhealthy to you? Come on now be honest.[/p][/quote]Wholeheartedly agree, yes, BMI is stupid. Muscle is far denser than fat so someone that has a lot of muscle will have a high BMI. The BMI test is simply not fit for purpose for many many people.[/p][/quote]I agree to a certain extent. BMI doesn't work for everybody - but I'm not sure many many people.... Most people aren't athletes or overly muscle bound. BMI is probably useful as a guide for the majority of the population. GroundhogDay

9:44am Wed 5 Feb 14

ChannelX says...

BMI doesn't 'work' for world class athletes, no. Mainly because world class athletes, by definition, have bodies, diets and training regimens that NO 'normal' person would ever come remotely close to.

The fact remains that for the general public, virtually all who are found overweight or obese under the BMI equation will be overweight or obese due to being fat.

It's interesting that, at a time we're constantly told food is really expensive and Foodbanks are a necessary part of life, the only solution most people seem to be able to come up with is to add tax to certain foods.

Pointless. Those who enjoy crap food that makes them fat will always find a way (and the money) to eat it.

Sadly, we have to accept that the majority of people don't care about being fat as long as they can eat what they prefer and don't want the bother of doing any exercise. Also, it has long since been proven that the more fat people there are around us, the more being fat becomes normalised and others are happy to 'let themselves go'.

This problem, as in the States, will only get worse. The only upside is that a significant amount of people will start dying comparatively early due to their obesity and that will partly ameliorate the problem of an extended old age population.
BMI doesn't 'work' for world class athletes, no. Mainly because world class athletes, by definition, have bodies, diets and training regimens that NO 'normal' person would ever come remotely close to. The fact remains that for the general public, virtually all who are found overweight or obese under the BMI equation will be overweight or obese due to being fat. It's interesting that, at a time we're constantly told food is really expensive and Foodbanks are a necessary part of life, the only solution most people seem to be able to come up with is to add tax to certain foods. Pointless. Those who enjoy crap food that makes them fat will always find a way (and the money) to eat it. Sadly, we have to accept that the majority of people don't care about being fat as long as they can eat what they prefer and don't want the bother of doing any exercise. Also, it has long since been proven that the more fat people there are around us, the more being fat becomes normalised and others are happy to 'let themselves go'. This problem, as in the States, will only get worse. The only upside is that a significant amount of people will start dying comparatively early due to their obesity and that will partly ameliorate the problem of an extended old age population. ChannelX

9:52am Wed 5 Feb 14

Hmmmf says...

ChannelX wrote:
ameliorate the problem of an extended old age population.

I doubt you'll regard old age as problem requiring amelioration when you get there. Besides, pensioners have never been healthier or less dependent. http://goo.gl/wkbQ6d
[quote][p][bold]ChannelX[/bold] wrote: ameliorate the problem of an extended old age population.[/quote] I doubt you'll regard old age as problem requiring amelioration when you get there. Besides, pensioners have never been healthier or less dependent. http://goo.gl/wkbQ6d Hmmmf

10:07am Wed 5 Feb 14

ChannelX says...

Hmmmf wrote:
ChannelX wrote:
ameliorate the problem of an extended old age population.

I doubt you'll regard old age as problem requiring amelioration when you get there. Besides, pensioners have never been healthier or less dependent. http://goo.gl/wkbQ6d
True, although I have absolutely no desire to live til 90 or whatever. Whatever anyone may pretend, for the vast majority the period of time anyone lives over a certain age is unlikely to be a hugely pleasant experience.

Yes, CURRENT pensioners are living well - we already know that, it's one of the major problems facing our economy - but how many people who were 40 in 1970 were obese? Hardly any, and certainly nothing compared to those who are 40 and obese in 2014.

How many people who were kids in the 1940s ate junk food, drank Coke all day and did drugs?

It's laughable to compare the health and wellbeing of a person who is 80 in 2014 to what you expect the health of a person who will be 80 in 2054 might be.
[quote][p][bold]Hmmmf[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ChannelX[/bold] wrote: ameliorate the problem of an extended old age population.[/quote] I doubt you'll regard old age as problem requiring amelioration when you get there. Besides, pensioners have never been healthier or less dependent. http://goo.gl/wkbQ6d[/p][/quote]True, although I have absolutely no desire to live til 90 or whatever. Whatever anyone may pretend, for the vast majority the period of time anyone lives over a certain age is unlikely to be a hugely pleasant experience. Yes, CURRENT pensioners are living well - we already know that, it's one of the major problems facing our economy - but how many people who were 40 in 1970 were obese? Hardly any, and certainly nothing compared to those who are 40 and obese in 2014. How many people who were kids in the 1940s ate junk food, drank Coke all day and did drugs? It's laughable to compare the health and wellbeing of a person who is 80 in 2014 to what you expect the health of a person who will be 80 in 2054 might be. ChannelX

10:12am Wed 5 Feb 14

The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man says...

ChannelX wrote:
BMI doesn't 'work' for world class athletes, no. Mainly because world class athletes, by definition, have bodies, diets and training regimens that NO 'normal' person would ever come remotely close to.

The fact remains that for the general public, virtually all who are found overweight or obese under the BMI equation will be overweight or obese due to being fat.

It's interesting that, at a time we're constantly told food is really expensive and Foodbanks are a necessary part of life, the only solution most people seem to be able to come up with is to add tax to certain foods.

Pointless. Those who enjoy crap food that makes them fat will always find a way (and the money) to eat it.

Sadly, we have to accept that the majority of people don't care about being fat as long as they can eat what they prefer and don't want the bother of doing any exercise. Also, it has long since been proven that the more fat people there are around us, the more being fat becomes normalised and others are happy to 'let themselves go'.

This problem, as in the States, will only get worse. The only upside is that a significant amount of people will start dying comparatively early due to their obesity and that will partly ameliorate the problem of an extended old age population.
BMI doesn't work for many normal people either.

For instance I do not consider myself an athlete of any type. I have a low body fat percentage yet BMI considers me overweight. I'm not, I just look after myself and exercise regularly.

So let me rephrase. BMI does not work for anyone that looks after themselves and has more muscle than fat.
[quote][p][bold]ChannelX[/bold] wrote: BMI doesn't 'work' for world class athletes, no. Mainly because world class athletes, by definition, have bodies, diets and training regimens that NO 'normal' person would ever come remotely close to. The fact remains that for the general public, virtually all who are found overweight or obese under the BMI equation will be overweight or obese due to being fat. It's interesting that, at a time we're constantly told food is really expensive and Foodbanks are a necessary part of life, the only solution most people seem to be able to come up with is to add tax to certain foods. Pointless. Those who enjoy crap food that makes them fat will always find a way (and the money) to eat it. Sadly, we have to accept that the majority of people don't care about being fat as long as they can eat what they prefer and don't want the bother of doing any exercise. Also, it has long since been proven that the more fat people there are around us, the more being fat becomes normalised and others are happy to 'let themselves go'. This problem, as in the States, will only get worse. The only upside is that a significant amount of people will start dying comparatively early due to their obesity and that will partly ameliorate the problem of an extended old age population.[/p][/quote]BMI doesn't work for many normal people either. For instance I do not consider myself an athlete of any type. I have a low body fat percentage yet BMI considers me overweight. I'm not, I just look after myself and exercise regularly. So let me rephrase. BMI does not work for anyone that looks after themselves and has more muscle than fat. The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man

10:14am Wed 5 Feb 14

swindondad says...

ChannellX,

It is not just "world class athletes" that BMI does not work for.

I for one am far from that and when I noticed that I needed to go to the next hole on my belt I did weigh myself and my BMI came in at 24 (the high end of healthy) but as I did not like the extra "middle aged spread" I increased the amount of exercise I took and lost the two inches.

Surprise Surprise when I weighed myself again my BMI (25.5) had gone UP and I was now classed as "overweight".

People would be much better off using the old "pinch an inch (or for some grab a handful)" test.
ChannellX, It is not just "world class athletes" that BMI does not work for. I for one am far from that and when I noticed that I needed to go to the next hole on my belt I did weigh myself and my BMI came in at 24 (the high end of healthy) but as I did not like the extra "middle aged spread" I increased the amount of exercise I took and lost the two inches. Surprise Surprise when I weighed myself again my BMI (25.5) had gone UP and I was now classed as "overweight". People would be much better off using the old "pinch an inch (or for some grab a handful)" test. swindondad

10:24am Wed 5 Feb 14

swindondad says...

Being fit and healthy has little to do with your "height to weight ratio" (BMI) but a lot more to do with how "FAT" you are.

It may not be considered polite to say it to people but it is none the less true.

If you have "a pot belly", a "sagging backside" and "bingo wings" the chances are you are both "fat" and "unhealthy". Unfortunately that description does fit too many in this town today.
Being fit and healthy has little to do with your "height to weight ratio" (BMI) but a lot more to do with how "FAT" you are. It may not be considered polite to say it to people but it is none the less true. If you have "a pot belly", a "sagging backside" and "bingo wings" the chances are you are both "fat" and "unhealthy". Unfortunately that description does fit too many in this town today. swindondad

10:54am Wed 5 Feb 14

RichardR1 says...

swindondad totally agree sweetening the pill is not the answer when obesity costs the NHS a staggering £8bill+ a year and unlike alcohol and cigarettes is revenue neutral (no extra tax).
swindondad totally agree sweetening the pill is not the answer when obesity costs the NHS a staggering £8bill+ a year and unlike alcohol and cigarettes is revenue neutral (no extra tax). RichardR1

10:55am Wed 5 Feb 14

adsinibiza says...

swindondad wrote:
Being fit and healthy has little to do with your "height to weight ratio" (BMI) but a lot more to do with how "FAT" you are.

It may not be considered polite to say it to people but it is none the less true.

If you have "a pot belly", a "sagging backside" and "bingo wings" the chances are you are both "fat" and "unhealthy". Unfortunately that description does fit too many in this town today.
Quite agree - whatever BMI may say it's being fat that counts - and at the end of the day we should remember that for the vast majority of people being fat is a voluntary choice - generally speaking fat people eat too much, fat people eat the wrong kind of foods and fat people don't exercise.

Whilst education might be part of the solution, undoubtedly the real solution is for fat people to get off their backside and doo something about it!

I make no excuses for using the word fat rather than obese - obese makes it sound like a medical problem when it's not - in most cases it's an attitude problem!
[quote][p][bold]swindondad[/bold] wrote: Being fit and healthy has little to do with your "height to weight ratio" (BMI) but a lot more to do with how "FAT" you are. It may not be considered polite to say it to people but it is none the less true. If you have "a pot belly", a "sagging backside" and "bingo wings" the chances are you are both "fat" and "unhealthy". Unfortunately that description does fit too many in this town today.[/p][/quote]Quite agree - whatever BMI may say it's being fat that counts - and at the end of the day we should remember that for the vast majority of people being fat is a voluntary choice - generally speaking fat people eat too much, fat people eat the wrong kind of foods and fat people don't exercise. Whilst education might be part of the solution, undoubtedly the real solution is for fat people to get off their backside and doo something about it! I make no excuses for using the word fat rather than obese - obese makes it sound like a medical problem when it's not - in most cases it's an attitude problem! adsinibiza

11:04am Wed 5 Feb 14

Davey Gravey says...

A little bit of extra timber around the midriff isn't always a bad thing tests haveshiwn. Infact it can be a good thing.
Someone who is thin could be carrying alot of dangerous fat around their organs which is much more dangerous and could go unspotted.
The only real way is to employ common sense and live a healthy lifestyle to give yourself the best chance of healthy life. There are no guarantees as we all know though.
A little bit of extra timber around the midriff isn't always a bad thing tests haveshiwn. Infact it can be a good thing. Someone who is thin could be carrying alot of dangerous fat around their organs which is much more dangerous and could go unspotted. The only real way is to employ common sense and live a healthy lifestyle to give yourself the best chance of healthy life. There are no guarantees as we all know though. Davey Gravey

11:09am Wed 5 Feb 14

cockney dave says...

Firstly, BMI is a pointless system, no different to the non-medical advice of not drinking more than 21 units of alcohol per week which was made up during a meeting without any medical evidence (google that if you don’t believe me). I agree with scottwichall who has hit the nail on the head stating that this is a left wing nanny state group begging for further funding. Why the Swindon advertiser is printing this dribble brings to question which left wing nanny state group the editor or board of directors supports.
There is a more pressing issue that should be raised. This is nothing to do with weight but does include the way people look. The figures mentioned in this article state 70% but that surely is the percentage of ugly people in Swindon? Can anyone argue with that statistic? Surely not
When shopping in the town centre and eating a burger and smoking a fag outside a shop while the mrs shops, I very rarely see a female that I think..**** I would. That's not a good advert for Swindon
Firstly, BMI is a pointless system, no different to the non-medical advice of not drinking more than 21 units of alcohol per week which was made up during a meeting without any medical evidence (google that if you don’t believe me). I agree with scottwichall who has hit the nail on the head stating that this is a left wing nanny state group begging for further funding. Why the Swindon advertiser is printing this dribble brings to question which left wing nanny state group the editor or board of directors supports. There is a more pressing issue that should be raised. This is nothing to do with weight but does include the way people look. The figures mentioned in this article state 70% but that surely is the percentage of ugly people in Swindon? Can anyone argue with that statistic? Surely not When shopping in the town centre and eating a burger and smoking a fag outside a shop while the mrs shops, I very rarely see a female that I think..**** I would. That's not a good advert for Swindon cockney dave

11:50am Wed 5 Feb 14

adsinibiza says...

cockney dave wrote:
Firstly, BMI is a pointless system, no different to the non-medical advice of not drinking more than 21 units of alcohol per week which was made up during a meeting without any medical evidence (google that if you don’t believe me). I agree with scottwichall who has hit the nail on the head stating that this is a left wing nanny state group begging for further funding. Why the Swindon advertiser is printing this dribble brings to question which left wing nanny state group the editor or board of directors supports.
There is a more pressing issue that should be raised. This is nothing to do with weight but does include the way people look. The figures mentioned in this article state 70% but that surely is the percentage of ugly people in Swindon? Can anyone argue with that statistic? Surely not
When shopping in the town centre and eating a burger and smoking a fag outside a shop while the mrs shops, I very rarely see a female that I think..**** I would. That's not a good advert for Swindon
Try Longs bar on a Friday or Saturday evening - much prettier than in the town centre
[quote][p][bold]cockney dave[/bold] wrote: Firstly, BMI is a pointless system, no different to the non-medical advice of not drinking more than 21 units of alcohol per week which was made up during a meeting without any medical evidence (google that if you don’t believe me). I agree with scottwichall who has hit the nail on the head stating that this is a left wing nanny state group begging for further funding. Why the Swindon advertiser is printing this dribble brings to question which left wing nanny state group the editor or board of directors supports. There is a more pressing issue that should be raised. This is nothing to do with weight but does include the way people look. The figures mentioned in this article state 70% but that surely is the percentage of ugly people in Swindon? Can anyone argue with that statistic? Surely not When shopping in the town centre and eating a burger and smoking a fag outside a shop while the mrs shops, I very rarely see a female that I think..**** I would. That's not a good advert for Swindon[/p][/quote]Try Longs bar on a Friday or Saturday evening - much prettier than in the town centre adsinibiza

11:56am Wed 5 Feb 14

scottwichall says...

adsinibiza wrote:
cockney dave wrote:
Firstly, BMI is a pointless system, no different to the non-medical advice of not drinking more than 21 units of alcohol per week which was made up during a meeting without any medical evidence (google that if you don’t believe me). I agree with scottwichall who has hit the nail on the head stating that this is a left wing nanny state group begging for further funding. Why the Swindon advertiser is printing this dribble brings to question which left wing nanny state group the editor or board of directors supports.
There is a more pressing issue that should be raised. This is nothing to do with weight but does include the way people look. The figures mentioned in this article state 70% but that surely is the percentage of ugly people in Swindon? Can anyone argue with that statistic? Surely not
When shopping in the town centre and eating a burger and smoking a fag outside a shop while the mrs shops, I very rarely see a female that I think..**** I would. That's not a good advert for Swindon
Try Longs bar on a Friday or Saturday evening - much prettier than in the town centre
Yep, but by the time you stagger to Longs.. you will be so smashed a horses backside would look foxy....
[quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cockney dave[/bold] wrote: Firstly, BMI is a pointless system, no different to the non-medical advice of not drinking more than 21 units of alcohol per week which was made up during a meeting without any medical evidence (google that if you don’t believe me). I agree with scottwichall who has hit the nail on the head stating that this is a left wing nanny state group begging for further funding. Why the Swindon advertiser is printing this dribble brings to question which left wing nanny state group the editor or board of directors supports. There is a more pressing issue that should be raised. This is nothing to do with weight but does include the way people look. The figures mentioned in this article state 70% but that surely is the percentage of ugly people in Swindon? Can anyone argue with that statistic? Surely not When shopping in the town centre and eating a burger and smoking a fag outside a shop while the mrs shops, I very rarely see a female that I think..**** I would. That's not a good advert for Swindon[/p][/quote]Try Longs bar on a Friday or Saturday evening - much prettier than in the town centre[/p][/quote]Yep, but by the time you stagger to Longs.. you will be so smashed a horses backside would look foxy.... scottwichall

12:03pm Wed 5 Feb 14

Cooking_by_smoke_alarm says...

GroundhogDay says...

I don't think the council have a clue how to tackle this issue. Flogging off all the council owned leisure centres is unlikely to help.

I don't think central government has a clue either though. Love him or loathe him, Jamie Olivers' school dinner campaign highlighted that politicians don't understand the importance of food education or nutrition.

Personally I don't think it's that difficult to tackle. Common sense policies and some regulation would do wonders.
Score: 4

Why blame local councils and central government? this is individuals choices that have led to this. 50+ years ago, when the leisure centres were few or far between, this level of obesity did not exist. Encourage folks to cycle/walk to work would be a start. Tax high sugar content added foods.....maybe....b
ut potentially difficult to enforce.
GroundhogDay says... I don't think the council have a clue how to tackle this issue. Flogging off all the council owned leisure centres is unlikely to help. I don't think central government has a clue either though. Love him or loathe him, Jamie Olivers' school dinner campaign highlighted that politicians don't understand the importance of food education or nutrition. Personally I don't think it's that difficult to tackle. Common sense policies and some regulation would do wonders. Score: 4 Why blame local councils and central government? this is individuals choices that have led to this. 50+ years ago, when the leisure centres were few or far between, this level of obesity did not exist. Encourage folks to cycle/walk to work would be a start. Tax high sugar content added foods.....maybe....b ut potentially difficult to enforce. Cooking_by_smoke_alarm

12:04pm Wed 5 Feb 14

Cooking_by_smoke_alarm says...

ChannelX says...

I blame the Foodbanks.
Score: -4

Are you Baron-Cohen in disguise?
ChannelX says... I blame the Foodbanks. Score: -4 Are you Baron-Cohen in disguise? Cooking_by_smoke_alarm

12:30pm Wed 5 Feb 14

mattbooker says...

Any young men wanting to get out more, try some new activities / sports and make new friends would be welcome to join Swindon Round Table. Just find our website or facebook page and get in touch.

http://www.facebook.
com/swindonroundtabl
e
Any young men wanting to get out more, try some new activities / sports and make new friends would be welcome to join Swindon Round Table. Just find our website or facebook page and get in touch. http://www.facebook. com/swindonroundtabl e mattbooker

12:31pm Wed 5 Feb 14

GroundhogDay says...

Cooking_by_smoke_ala
rm
wrote:
GroundhogDay says...

I don't think the council have a clue how to tackle this issue. Flogging off all the council owned leisure centres is unlikely to help.

I don't think central government has a clue either though. Love him or loathe him, Jamie Olivers' school dinner campaign highlighted that politicians don't understand the importance of food education or nutrition.

Personally I don't think it's that difficult to tackle. Common sense policies and some regulation would do wonders.
Score: 4

Why blame local councils and central government? this is individuals choices that have led to this. 50+ years ago, when the leisure centres were few or far between, this level of obesity did not exist. Encourage folks to cycle/walk to work would be a start. Tax high sugar content added foods.....maybe....b

ut potentially difficult to enforce.
Surely a lot of the choices available to people are directly attributable to political decisions / policies over the past 50+ years?
[quote][p][bold]Cooking_by_smoke_ala rm[/bold] wrote: GroundhogDay says... I don't think the council have a clue how to tackle this issue. Flogging off all the council owned leisure centres is unlikely to help. I don't think central government has a clue either though. Love him or loathe him, Jamie Olivers' school dinner campaign highlighted that politicians don't understand the importance of food education or nutrition. Personally I don't think it's that difficult to tackle. Common sense policies and some regulation would do wonders. Score: 4 Why blame local councils and central government? this is individuals choices that have led to this. 50+ years ago, when the leisure centres were few or far between, this level of obesity did not exist. Encourage folks to cycle/walk to work would be a start. Tax high sugar content added foods.....maybe....b ut potentially difficult to enforce.[/p][/quote]Surely a lot of the choices available to people are directly attributable to political decisions / policies over the past 50+ years? GroundhogDay

1:47pm Wed 5 Feb 14

beach1e says...

not sure why they needed to do a survey relying on the public to respond , surely it would be better to take a cross section of data from the local health centres.seems like there are too many publicly funded groups doing the same job...so the story is, yes there are a lot of unfit people in Swindon and too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on organisations that shouldn't exist.
not sure why they needed to do a survey relying on the public to respond , surely it would be better to take a cross section of data from the local health centres.seems like there are too many publicly funded groups doing the same job...so the story is, yes there are a lot of unfit people in Swindon and too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on organisations that shouldn't exist. beach1e

1:50pm Wed 5 Feb 14

adsinibiza says...

beach1e wrote:
not sure why they needed to do a survey relying on the public to respond , surely it would be better to take a cross section of data from the local health centres.seems like there are too many publicly funded groups doing the same job...so the story is, yes there are a lot of unfit people in Swindon and too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on organisations that shouldn't exist.
Also too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on treatment for avoidable health problems caused by being overweight such as heart problems and diabetes
[quote][p][bold]beach1e[/bold] wrote: not sure why they needed to do a survey relying on the public to respond , surely it would be better to take a cross section of data from the local health centres.seems like there are too many publicly funded groups doing the same job...so the story is, yes there are a lot of unfit people in Swindon and too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on organisations that shouldn't exist.[/p][/quote]Also too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on treatment for avoidable health problems caused by being overweight such as heart problems and diabetes adsinibiza

2:06pm Wed 5 Feb 14

benzss says...

adsinibiza wrote:
beach1e wrote:
not sure why they needed to do a survey relying on the public to respond , surely it would be better to take a cross section of data from the local health centres.seems like there are too many publicly funded groups doing the same job...so the story is, yes there are a lot of unfit people in Swindon and too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on organisations that shouldn't exist.
Also too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on treatment for avoidable health problems caused by being overweight such as heart problems and diabetes
What about sports injuries? Or other 'misadventure' type injuries?
[quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]beach1e[/bold] wrote: not sure why they needed to do a survey relying on the public to respond , surely it would be better to take a cross section of data from the local health centres.seems like there are too many publicly funded groups doing the same job...so the story is, yes there are a lot of unfit people in Swindon and too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on organisations that shouldn't exist.[/p][/quote]Also too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on treatment for avoidable health problems caused by being overweight such as heart problems and diabetes[/p][/quote]What about sports injuries? Or other 'misadventure' type injuries? benzss

2:13pm Wed 5 Feb 14

scottwichall says...

benzss wrote:
adsinibiza wrote:
beach1e wrote:
not sure why they needed to do a survey relying on the public to respond , surely it would be better to take a cross section of data from the local health centres.seems like there are too many publicly funded groups doing the same job...so the story is, yes there are a lot of unfit people in Swindon and too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on organisations that shouldn't exist.
Also too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on treatment for avoidable health problems caused by being overweight such as heart problems and diabetes
What about sports injuries? Or other 'misadventure' type injuries?
Like all the snapped tendons, broken bones up the A&E on a Sunday morning after foolball has been played by a load of overweight, bald fat blokes to "improve" their health.
[quote][p][bold]benzss[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]beach1e[/bold] wrote: not sure why they needed to do a survey relying on the public to respond , surely it would be better to take a cross section of data from the local health centres.seems like there are too many publicly funded groups doing the same job...so the story is, yes there are a lot of unfit people in Swindon and too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on organisations that shouldn't exist.[/p][/quote]Also too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on treatment for avoidable health problems caused by being overweight such as heart problems and diabetes[/p][/quote]What about sports injuries? Or other 'misadventure' type injuries?[/p][/quote]Like all the snapped tendons, broken bones up the A&E on a Sunday morning after foolball has been played by a load of overweight, bald fat blokes to "improve" their health. scottwichall

2:13pm Wed 5 Feb 14

adsinibiza says...

benzss wrote:
adsinibiza wrote:
beach1e wrote:
not sure why they needed to do a survey relying on the public to respond , surely it would be better to take a cross section of data from the local health centres.seems like there are too many publicly funded groups doing the same job...so the story is, yes there are a lot of unfit people in Swindon and too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on organisations that shouldn't exist.
Also too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on treatment for avoidable health problems caused by being overweight such as heart problems and diabetes
What about sports injuries? Or other 'misadventure' type injuries?
generally speaking playing sport and keeping yourself fit will mean a much reduced likelihood of requiring treatment for medical issues such as diabetes and heart disease - I'm not totally au fait with the figures but I doubt the cost for treating sports related injuries is going to be anything like the cost of treating the consequences of obesity such as heart disease and diabetes
[quote][p][bold]benzss[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]beach1e[/bold] wrote: not sure why they needed to do a survey relying on the public to respond , surely it would be better to take a cross section of data from the local health centres.seems like there are too many publicly funded groups doing the same job...so the story is, yes there are a lot of unfit people in Swindon and too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on organisations that shouldn't exist.[/p][/quote]Also too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on treatment for avoidable health problems caused by being overweight such as heart problems and diabetes[/p][/quote]What about sports injuries? Or other 'misadventure' type injuries?[/p][/quote]generally speaking playing sport and keeping yourself fit will mean a much reduced likelihood of requiring treatment for medical issues such as diabetes and heart disease - I'm not totally au fait with the figures but I doubt the cost for treating sports related injuries is going to be anything like the cost of treating the consequences of obesity such as heart disease and diabetes adsinibiza

2:24pm Wed 5 Feb 14

benzss says...

adsinibiza wrote:
benzss wrote:
adsinibiza wrote:
beach1e wrote:
not sure why they needed to do a survey relying on the public to respond , surely it would be better to take a cross section of data from the local health centres.seems like there are too many publicly funded groups doing the same job...so the story is, yes there are a lot of unfit people in Swindon and too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on organisations that shouldn't exist.
Also too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on treatment for avoidable health problems caused by being overweight such as heart problems and diabetes
What about sports injuries? Or other 'misadventure' type injuries?
generally speaking playing sport and keeping yourself fit will mean a much reduced likelihood of requiring treatment for medical issues such as diabetes and heart disease - I'm not totally au fait with the figures but I doubt the cost for treating sports related injuries is going to be anything like the cost of treating the consequences of obesity such as heart disease and diabetes
Of course obesity-related diseases will probably result in an earlier death, which saves a lot of money.

Those people going in every 5 minutes for rugby injuries may live into old age.

The thing is that the figure for what obesity 'costs' does not ask 'compared to what?'.

Anyway, if someone wants to be fat let them be fat. The lack of efficiency in the NHS oughtn't be used as a pretext to force people into a given lifestyle.
[quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]benzss[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]beach1e[/bold] wrote: not sure why they needed to do a survey relying on the public to respond , surely it would be better to take a cross section of data from the local health centres.seems like there are too many publicly funded groups doing the same job...so the story is, yes there are a lot of unfit people in Swindon and too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on organisations that shouldn't exist.[/p][/quote]Also too much hard earned working peoples money is spent on treatment for avoidable health problems caused by being overweight such as heart problems and diabetes[/p][/quote]What about sports injuries? Or other 'misadventure' type injuries?[/p][/quote]generally speaking playing sport and keeping yourself fit will mean a much reduced likelihood of requiring treatment for medical issues such as diabetes and heart disease - I'm not totally au fait with the figures but I doubt the cost for treating sports related injuries is going to be anything like the cost of treating the consequences of obesity such as heart disease and diabetes[/p][/quote]Of course obesity-related diseases will probably result in an earlier death, which saves a lot of money. Those people going in every 5 minutes for rugby injuries may live into old age. The thing is that the figure for what obesity 'costs' does not ask 'compared to what?'. Anyway, if someone wants to be fat let them be fat. The lack of efficiency in the NHS oughtn't be used as a pretext to force people into a given lifestyle. benzss

2:49pm Wed 5 Feb 14

ChannelX says...


Anyway, if someone wants to be fat let them be fat. The lack of efficiency in the NHS oughtn't be used as a pretext to force people into a given lifestyle.


True, but when the NHS is only sustained because the majority - for whatever reason - agree to fund it, there comes a point where you have to be a bit careful.

If it transpires that 50% of all NHS funding is being spent 'caring' for the obese, those who do not allow themselves to get into that state might just decide they no longer wish to fund the consequences of other people's gluttony.

It does make one wonder if quite so many people would be obese if they found they had to pay for their own resulting medical and health care. There is an arguement that states that, in the modern era, the NHS actually encourages people to be less, rather than more, healthy.
[quote] Anyway, if someone wants to be fat let them be fat. The lack of efficiency in the NHS oughtn't be used as a pretext to force people into a given lifestyle. [/quote] True, but when the NHS is only sustained because the majority - for whatever reason - agree to fund it, there comes a point where you have to be a bit careful. If it transpires that 50% of all NHS funding is being spent 'caring' for the obese, those who do not allow themselves to get into that state might just decide they no longer wish to fund the consequences of other people's gluttony. It does make one wonder if quite so many people would be obese if they found they had to pay for their own resulting medical and health care. There is an arguement that states that, in the modern era, the NHS actually encourages people to be less, rather than more, healthy. ChannelX

3:17pm Wed 5 Feb 14

knittynora says...

Maybe our Councillors could set us all an example by going on across party slim? There's more than a few lardbuckets in that council chamber, I can tell you.
Maybe our Councillors could set us all an example by going on across party slim? There's more than a few lardbuckets in that council chamber, I can tell you. knittynora

3:48pm Wed 5 Feb 14

adsinibiza says...

The following is an interesting article to read with regard to the cost of Diabetes to the NHS:

http://www.nhs.uk/ne
ws/2012/04april/Page
s/nhs-diabetes-costs
-cases-rising.aspx
The following is an interesting article to read with regard to the cost of Diabetes to the NHS: http://www.nhs.uk/ne ws/2012/04april/Page s/nhs-diabetes-costs -cases-rising.aspx adsinibiza

3:48pm Wed 5 Feb 14

adsinibiza says...

and this one:

http://www.diabetes.
co.uk/cost-of-diabet
es.html
and this one: http://www.diabetes. co.uk/cost-of-diabet es.html adsinibiza

4:22pm Wed 5 Feb 14

Hmmmf says...

adsinbiza wrote:
generally speaking playing sport and keeping yourself fit will mean a much reduced likelihood of requiring treatment for medical issues such as diabetes and heart disease - I'm not totally au fait with the figures but I doubt the cost for treating sports related injuries is going to be anything like the cost of treating the consequences of obesity such as heart disease and diabetes

Swindon
A&E admissions due to unintentional injury: 44,794
Hospital admissions due to unintentional injury: 1608
Acute sexually transmitted infections: 1876
Early deaths, cancer: 224
Smoking-related deaths: 251

Early deaths, heart disease and strokes: 118
People diagnosed with diabetes: 10,100

A 2012 EU report concluded that most of the health benefits of playing sport were eroded by the estimated 2.6 Billion Euro annual cost of medical treatment sports injuries consumed across the community, and the 30,000 permanent disabilities annually arising from them.
[quote][p][bold]adsinbiza[/bold] wrote: generally speaking playing sport and keeping yourself fit will mean a much reduced likelihood of requiring treatment for medical issues such as diabetes and heart disease - I'm not totally au fait with the figures but I doubt the cost for treating sports related injuries is going to be anything like the cost of treating the consequences of obesity such as heart disease and diabetes[/quote] Swindon A&E admissions due to unintentional injury: 44,794 Hospital admissions due to unintentional injury: 1608 Acute sexually transmitted infections: 1876 Early deaths, cancer: 224 Smoking-related deaths: 251 Early deaths, heart disease and strokes: 118 People diagnosed with diabetes: 10,100 A 2012 EU report concluded that most of the health benefits of playing sport were eroded by the estimated 2.6 Billion Euro annual cost of medical treatment sports injuries consumed across the community, and the 30,000 permanent disabilities annually arising from them. Hmmmf

5:04pm Wed 5 Feb 14

Badgersgetabadname says...

After recently booking a flight and seeing how expensive the add ons are for additional luggage I spoke with some friends about possible answers.
How about a total flight weight passenger plus luggage = x amount over which there is an additional charge.
As far as the Swindon issue it is life choice like booze and fags if this is your choice you should not be entitled to the same health cover that someone with a healthy lifestyle has.
If it is a coping tool that is fine but cannot go on forever.
After recently booking a flight and seeing how expensive the add ons are for additional luggage I spoke with some friends about possible answers. How about a total flight weight passenger plus luggage = x amount over which there is an additional charge. As far as the Swindon issue it is life choice like booze and fags if this is your choice you should not be entitled to the same health cover that someone with a healthy lifestyle has. If it is a coping tool that is fine but cannot go on forever. Badgersgetabadname

6:11pm Wed 5 Feb 14

adsinibiza says...

Hmmmf wrote:
adsinbiza wrote:
generally speaking playing sport and keeping yourself fit will mean a much reduced likelihood of requiring treatment for medical issues such as diabetes and heart disease - I'm not totally au fait with the figures but I doubt the cost for treating sports related injuries is going to be anything like the cost of treating the consequences of obesity such as heart disease and diabetes

Swindon
A&E admissions due to unintentional injury: 44,794
Hospital admissions due to unintentional injury: 1608
Acute sexually transmitted infections: 1876
Early deaths, cancer: 224
Smoking-related deaths: 251

Early deaths, heart disease and strokes: 118
People diagnosed with diabetes: 10,100

A 2012 EU report concluded that most of the health benefits of playing sport were eroded by the estimated 2.6 Billion Euro annual cost of medical treatment sports injuries consumed across the community, and the 30,000 permanent disabilities annually arising from them.
okay so the numbers are on the face of it impressive - however what exactly are unintentional injuries??? Are they all sports related??? or do they include other things??? I would also hazard a guess that almost all injuries are unintentional???

Also what about the costs? What is the cost of the average unintentional injury compared to say the cost of treating the average patient with diabetes induced heart disease? I suspect there is a huge difference?

There are also other issues such as the social costs of chronic illness caused by obesity - I took the following from diabetes.co.uk:

Cost of absenteeism: £8.4 billion per year
Cost of early retirement: £6.9 billion per year
Cost of social benefits: £0.152 billion

That's a lot of money!
[quote][p][bold]Hmmmf[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]adsinbiza[/bold] wrote: generally speaking playing sport and keeping yourself fit will mean a much reduced likelihood of requiring treatment for medical issues such as diabetes and heart disease - I'm not totally au fait with the figures but I doubt the cost for treating sports related injuries is going to be anything like the cost of treating the consequences of obesity such as heart disease and diabetes[/quote] Swindon A&E admissions due to unintentional injury: 44,794 Hospital admissions due to unintentional injury: 1608 Acute sexually transmitted infections: 1876 Early deaths, cancer: 224 Smoking-related deaths: 251 Early deaths, heart disease and strokes: 118 People diagnosed with diabetes: 10,100 A 2012 EU report concluded that most of the health benefits of playing sport were eroded by the estimated 2.6 Billion Euro annual cost of medical treatment sports injuries consumed across the community, and the 30,000 permanent disabilities annually arising from them.[/p][/quote]okay so the numbers are on the face of it impressive - however what exactly are unintentional injuries??? Are they all sports related??? or do they include other things??? I would also hazard a guess that almost all injuries are unintentional??? Also what about the costs? What is the cost of the average unintentional injury compared to say the cost of treating the average patient with diabetes induced heart disease? I suspect there is a huge difference? There are also other issues such as the social costs of chronic illness caused by obesity - I took the following from diabetes.co.uk: Cost of absenteeism: £8.4 billion per year Cost of early retirement: £6.9 billion per year Cost of social benefits: £0.152 billion That's a lot of money! adsinibiza

6:33pm Wed 5 Feb 14

33mummyof2 says...

scottwichall wrote:
Sorry, I call BS on this set of "please keep funding us at our useless, left wing, hand waving, prod nosing, tax slurping quango" statistics.

To quote:
"Statistics published for the area by Public Health England yesterday revealed that 70 per cent of adults are overweight or obese, almost ten per cent more than people in the wider Wiltshire area."

That should read 70% of the adults WE HAVE FIGURES FOR.

Do they know what my weight is? No as I have not been weighed by any of the chancers with a god complex for 15 years. I suspect there are rather a large amount of people who they do not have figures for.

And funnily enough when I popped out to Coate Water a couple of Sundays ago as it was a glorious day, were 7 out of 10 people fat? No is the simple answer to that.

And my fundamentally flawed measurement known as the BMI is in the healthy weight range.
That is exactly what i was thinking! People's weight changes as well. For example when i joined my doctors they recorded my weight when i was pregnant! so the weight they have for me would class me as overweight which I am not as my bmi is 22!
[quote][p][bold]scottwichall[/bold] wrote: Sorry, I call BS on this set of "please keep funding us at our useless, left wing, hand waving, prod nosing, tax slurping quango" statistics. To quote: "Statistics published for the area by Public Health England yesterday revealed that 70 per cent of adults are overweight or obese, almost ten per cent more than people in the wider Wiltshire area." That should read 70% of the adults WE HAVE FIGURES FOR. Do they know what my weight is? No as I have not been weighed by any of the chancers with a god complex for 15 years. I suspect there are rather a large amount of people who they do not have figures for. And funnily enough when I popped out to Coate Water a couple of Sundays ago as it was a glorious day, were 7 out of 10 people fat? No is the simple answer to that. And my fundamentally flawed measurement known as the BMI is in the healthy weight range.[/p][/quote]That is exactly what i was thinking! People's weight changes as well. For example when i joined my doctors they recorded my weight when i was pregnant! so the weight they have for me would class me as overweight which I am not as my bmi is 22! 33mummyof2

7:21pm Wed 5 Feb 14

house on the hill says...

Lots of statistics but no solutions! So what is the answer then????
Lots of statistics but no solutions! So what is the answer then???? house on the hill

8:27pm Wed 5 Feb 14

ChannelX says...

house on the hill wrote:
Lots of statistics but no solutions! So what is the answer then????
Eat less
[quote][p][bold]house on the hill[/bold] wrote: Lots of statistics but no solutions! So what is the answer then????[/p][/quote]Eat less ChannelX

9:16pm Wed 5 Feb 14

Matt Fruci says...

It definitely seems to be a "misunderstood" concept. We struggle to define obesity so how can we treat it? Check out my blog on obesity...http://per
sonaltrainerswindon.
com/?p=501
It definitely seems to be a "misunderstood" concept. We struggle to define obesity so how can we treat it? Check out my blog on obesity...http://per sonaltrainerswindon. com/?p=501 Matt Fruci

9:29pm Wed 5 Feb 14

adsinibiza says...

house on the hill wrote:
Lots of statistics but no solutions! So what is the answer then????
eat less/more of the right things and exercise more
[quote][p][bold]house on the hill[/bold] wrote: Lots of statistics but no solutions! So what is the answer then????[/p][/quote]eat less/more of the right things and exercise more adsinibiza

10:56pm Wed 5 Feb 14

the don69 says...

house on the hill wrote:
Lots of statistics but no solutions! So what is the answer then????
Stop eating junk food and exercise simple lol!!!!!!!
[quote][p][bold]house on the hill[/bold] wrote: Lots of statistics but no solutions! So what is the answer then????[/p][/quote]Stop eating junk food and exercise simple lol!!!!!!! the don69

11:30am Thu 6 Feb 14

RichardR1 says...

Badgersgetabadname how do you square that view with the fact that several studies have shown those who live a 'healthy' life style live longer and cost the NHS more due to late life debilitating diseases.
Badgersgetabadname how do you square that view with the fact that several studies have shown those who live a 'healthy' life style live longer and cost the NHS more due to late life debilitating diseases. RichardR1

1:05pm Thu 6 Feb 14

Shayla says...

Try this!! It works and the weight stays off combined with a little exercise each day. This will change your nutritional lifestlye :) http://teamviforall.
bodybyvi.com
Try this!! It works and the weight stays off combined with a little exercise each day. This will change your nutritional lifestlye :) http://teamviforall. bodybyvi.com Shayla

4:09pm Thu 6 Feb 14

cockney dave says...

Firstly, the ironic thing is the man in the picture at the start of article is probably a doctor lol

I have a simple answer, Stop wasting money on these pathetic groups who create these stores (majority of them are fake because they play with numbers and figures and not give the whole story only their own) and make the councillors lead by example and reduce costs. Make the NHS stop wasting money making people redundant on a Friday with a massive pay off and employ them in another dept. on the Monday. Reduce the number of manager’s in the NHS and increase front line staff. This in itself will save a fortune and increase the nursing numbers. Manage the NHS correctly and stop them from killing thousands of people each year with medical neglect and impose prison sentences on the staff so they pay for incompetence, this in turn will improve the overall performance. Then who needs to care if someone is happy and fat, we all make our choices. Maybe some fat people want to die young so they don’t live the years where they turn back into a baby and unable to look after themselves and live in nappies. The main thing here is STOP TELLING PEOPLE HOW TO LIVE THEIR LIFE. A government is appointed to look after the country and the running of services. Not telling us what to do on a daily bases.
Also, one last point.
A drinking smoking driver puts more money into the system than a tee total grass eating cyclist. We put into the system to support our needs. We invest to be looked after when we need it. Now shut up and move on. There are more important things to discuss if only this silly edited newspaper had the bottle to print the truth instead of following the nanny state propaganda they government and big business what I to believe. How about this for a start which is proof the EU stop the government from doing anything about places that flood
http://eureferendum.
com/blogview.aspx?bl
ogno=84683
Firstly, the ironic thing is the man in the picture at the start of article is probably a doctor lol I have a simple answer, Stop wasting money on these pathetic groups who create these stores (majority of them are fake because they play with numbers and figures and not give the whole story only their own) and make the councillors lead by example and reduce costs. Make the NHS stop wasting money making people redundant on a Friday with a massive pay off and employ them in another dept. on the Monday. Reduce the number of manager’s in the NHS and increase front line staff. This in itself will save a fortune and increase the nursing numbers. Manage the NHS correctly and stop them from killing thousands of people each year with medical neglect and impose prison sentences on the staff so they pay for incompetence, this in turn will improve the overall performance. Then who needs to care if someone is happy and fat, we all make our choices. Maybe some fat people want to die young so they don’t live the years where they turn back into a baby and unable to look after themselves and live in nappies. The main thing here is STOP TELLING PEOPLE HOW TO LIVE THEIR LIFE. A government is appointed to look after the country and the running of services. Not telling us what to do on a daily bases. Also, one last point. A drinking smoking driver puts more money into the system than a tee total grass eating cyclist. We put into the system to support our needs. We invest to be looked after when we need it. Now shut up and move on. There are more important things to discuss if only this silly edited newspaper had the bottle to print the truth instead of following the nanny state propaganda they government and big business what I to believe. How about this for a start which is proof the EU stop the government from doing anything about places that flood http://eureferendum. com/blogview.aspx?bl ogno=84683 cockney dave

9:06pm Thu 6 Feb 14

GalaxyMan says...

Gosh that is depressing. Still, I cheered myself up with a nice cream éclair and a big bar of Cadbury's Wholenut.
Gosh that is depressing. Still, I cheered myself up with a nice cream éclair and a big bar of Cadbury's Wholenut. GalaxyMan

3:22pm Sat 8 Feb 14

mikebuss says...

The government and local councils are never going to tackle obesity by scratching the surface of adult obesity, its too late the damage is already done!
Start with kids at primary school, 1 in 4 kids under the age of 14yrs are now obese, this is shocking! Teach the kids (the adults of tomorrow) healthy life styles and in 10yrs time we will have a drop in obesity, we can only look at the future.
The government and local councils are never going to tackle obesity by scratching the surface of adult obesity, its too late the damage is already done! Start with kids at primary school, 1 in 4 kids under the age of 14yrs are now obese, this is shocking! Teach the kids (the adults of tomorrow) healthy life styles and in 10yrs time we will have a drop in obesity, we can only look at the future. mikebuss

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