Award for Devizes carer who gives extra

This Is Wiltshire: Volunteer Corey Gleed-Ellis with, from left, Phil Howells, mayor Pete Smith and Steve Mitchell.            (VS157) By VICKY SCIPIO Volunteer Corey Gleed-Ellis with, from left, Phil Howells, mayor Pete Smith and Steve Mitchell. (VS157) By VICKY SCIPIO

Young carer Corey Gleed-Ellis has won an award for the volunteering work he does to help others in the same situation as himself.

Corey, 16, who lives in Devizes, has been a young carer for four-and-a-half years, helping mum Lynn to look after his dad, Stephen, who has arthritis, his twin brother, Reece, who has learning difficulties, and his younger brother, Connor, who has Asperger’s syndrome and health issues.

He helps with household tasks and cooking for four to five hours each day.

As part of Wiltshire Young Carers, Corey also volunteers to help with respite groups for other young carers and supported young carers on a music project with Bath Philharmonia.

He is an ambassador for another youth programme and is now doing peer mentoring training with Youth Action Wiltshire.

He beat thousands of nominees to win a Halifax Giving Extra award and £250 in vouchers. The awards were launched last year, to celebrate unsung heroes giving something back to their communities.

Corey was nominated by Niki Andrews, the Wiltshire Young Carers service manager at Youth Action Wiltshire, who cited his tireless support for others on top of his caring responsibilities.

Corey, who went to Devizes School and is now studying for a BTEC First Diploma in public services and essential English at New College, Swindon, wants to join the police force.

He will use the vouchers to buy an iPad for researching coursework and assignments.

He said: “I feel shocked to be chosen out of the many nominations. I had never won anything in my life before.”

He said it was important to help young carers to develop confidence and to feel they were not alone in their role.

“I get to help other young carers who are in the same boat as me to get a break from their caring responsibilities.

“That one break can help lift their mood and they are all ready for the next phase of caring responsibilities.

“I enjoy helping young carers to be able to talk to other people about what they do.”

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