Burglar stole locket with father’s ashes

This Is Wiltshire: Chantale Coady and her 18-month-old son Ocean pictured in the play area where two men broke into the house in the Rushey Platt area of Swindon stealing, among other things, a locket containing the ashesof her father Chantale Coady and her 18-month-old son Ocean pictured in the play area where two men broke into the house in the Rushey Platt area of Swindon stealing, among other things, a locket containing the ashesof her father

A PRICELESS locket containing the ashes of the father of Chantale Coady was stolen from her home after armed burglars broke in last month.

Luke Cookson, 18, was sentenced to two years in prison after Swindon Crown Court heard he entered the house through a one-year-old’s play room carrying a knife on February 4.

Cookson had only been out of prison a few weeks before he was caught shining a torch into properties in Rushey Platt with a friend, looking for things to steal.

Ms Coady, 34, had been disturbed by her dog in the night but did not realise anything was missing until the next day, when her handbag and a laptop were gone.

“We had only been living here for two weeks before they came and burgled us,” she said.

“On the night I had come down at about 1.30am because the dog was barking, but I just thought he was cooped up. I let him out and went back up to bed.”

The next day she realised her handbag was gone and a Macbook Air laptop was missing.

“They were caught trying another house about an hour later, and they still had eveything on them but the bag had been emptied,” she said. “There was £180 in cash they did not even notice.

“The necklace was in the bag and had my dad’s ashes in,” she said. “I have put it all over Facebook, and I have quite a large following from my work as a tattoo artist, but even people who knew Cookson did not know what he had done with it.

This Is Wiltshire:

Guy Bourgerie

“Our dad died five years ago, and he was from Normandy, so I designed the necklace with that in mind. I had put a lot of effort into it. I was looking for a family crest, but I had to go right back to the original Normandy flag and had that designed into a necklace.

“It is absolutely priceless to me. If they sold it off they would only get the weight of the silver.

“The thing that really angers me is they had a knife on them when they came in. They broke into a house through a children’s play room, and there is no hiding that fact. It just shows what scum they are. I think with people like that it doesn’t matter what sentence you give them, they will get out and do it again.”

Tessa Hingston, prosecuting Cookson, said police had recovered most items. “Still missing from the handbag is a purse with about £20 cash, debit and credit cards, earmuffs, some business keys and a driving licence,” she said.

“Also a silver charm necklace missing on a silk lace rope chain. Inside one charm were her father’s ashes which as she says is irreplaceable."

Cookson, of Sheppard Street, pleaded guilty to a charge of burglary. He also admitted possessing a bladed article and magistrates gave him a short jail term for it at an earlier hearing.

The court heard he received a 12 month sentence in August last year after admitting two counts of house burglary.

Comments (11)

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8:40am Tue 11 Mar 14

ChannelX says...

Two years? For a repeat convicted criminal who entered a property armed with a knife?!

No wonder armed burglars such as Luke Cookson are more than happy to continually repeat their crimes. Just imagine the amount of burglaries they don't get caught for.

He'll be released within a year to burgle more properties.

Something needs to be done about the relentless unduly lenient sentencing by our utterly hopeless judiciary. They will only learn once a system of local elections for judges is introduced.

And that needs to happen SOON.
Two years? For a repeat convicted criminal who entered a property armed with a knife?! No wonder armed burglars such as Luke Cookson are more than happy to continually repeat their crimes. Just imagine the amount of burglaries they don't get caught for. He'll be released within a year to burgle more properties. Something needs to be done about the relentless unduly lenient sentencing by our utterly hopeless judiciary. They will only learn once a system of local elections for judges is introduced. And that needs to happen SOON. ChannelX
  • Score: 21

10:23am Tue 11 Mar 14

SwindonWatcher says...

Just another example to prove that the law is an Ar#e!!!!

The yobs of today are too lazy to work but think it is ok to steal other peoples property. I hope the item is recovered.

Lock them up and keep them locked up I say.
Just another example to prove that the law is an Ar#e!!!! The yobs of today are too lazy to work but think it is ok to steal other peoples property. I hope the item is recovered. Lock them up and keep them locked up I say. SwindonWatcher
  • Score: 13

11:13am Tue 11 Mar 14

AndySN3 says...

I hope that this item is recovered and given back to Chantale, what a heartless crime!
Until the law is changed and our pathetic floundering judges put themselves in the shoes of the victims instead of living in their "unreal world" this will keep happening.
Burglars are low life sh1t, and should be treated as such. You will have the liberal brigade fighting their corner with cries of a poor home life or a broken home, or a drug problem!! So what, they are scum and the people that defend and let them off are as guilty in my eyes. It is time to wake up and deal with these people once and for all.
I hope that this item is recovered and given back to Chantale, what a heartless crime! Until the law is changed and our pathetic floundering judges put themselves in the shoes of the victims instead of living in their "unreal world" this will keep happening. Burglars are low life sh1t, and should be treated as such. You will have the liberal brigade fighting their corner with cries of a poor home life or a broken home, or a drug problem!! So what, they are scum and the people that defend and let them off are as guilty in my eyes. It is time to wake up and deal with these people once and for all. AndySN3
  • Score: 15

11:15am Tue 11 Mar 14

SwindonWatcher says...

If everyone from a broken home committed crime we'd really be screwed. You choose a life of crime, it's a lifestyle choice.

Scum all of them!!!
If everyone from a broken home committed crime we'd really be screwed. You choose a life of crime, it's a lifestyle choice. Scum all of them!!! SwindonWatcher
  • Score: 10

11:56am Tue 11 Mar 14

Wiltshirereader says...

It SHOULD be a case of "if you can't face the time, don't do the crime" BUT what deterrent is there? A slap on the wrist?? Time for these low life thieves to be given a proper sentence and get the message across that it won't be tolerated!!!!!!!
It SHOULD be a case of "if you can't face the time, don't do the crime" BUT what deterrent is there? A slap on the wrist?? Time for these low life thieves to be given a proper sentence and get the message across that it won't be tolerated!!!!!!! Wiltshirereader
  • Score: 7

12:59pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Davey Gravey says...

Another example of scum that should be put to sleep.
Another example of scum that should be put to sleep. Davey Gravey
  • Score: 8

1:03pm Tue 11 Mar 14

ChannelX says...

SwindonWatcher wrote:
Just another example to prove that the law is an Ar#e!!!!

The yobs of today are too lazy to work but think it is ok to steal other peoples property. I hope the item is recovered.

Lock them up and keep them locked up I say.
The law itself is not an ****. Indeed, the judiciary's own Sentencing Guidelines often allow for quite harsh maximum sentences.

For example the crime Cookson was convicted of this time was Burglary (domestic). Under the Theft Act 1968 s.9(3)(a) the judge had a maximum sentence of 14 years available to him/her.

As the convict was a repeat offender who had barely just been released (halfway through) his previous sentence, the most recent crime should have been dealt with more severely.

Also, there were several aggravating factors to the crime and he was in possession of a knife.

Even taking into account the reduced sentence the judge would have given for the guilty plea (despite it being likely there was forensic evidence such that a not guilty plea would have been ridiculous) it is entirely inexplicable that anything less than a four year sentence would have been handed down in this case.

I would also recommend that Ms Coady considers reporting the sentence as unduly lenient to the Attorney General:

https://www.gov.uk/c
omplain-about-low-cr
own-court-sentence

Interesting to note the Adver have chosen to omit the name of the judge concerned in this case. I wonder if it was the same one who jailed him for the last raft of burglaries (which were committed whilst he was on bail for previous crimes):

http://www.thisiswil
tshire.co.uk/news/10
646988.Teenager_jail
ed_for_burglaries/

This quote from the above article rather says it all:


When he is released from youth custody he said the authorities will help him with accommodation and he will have a chance to lead a law-abiding life.


That went well.
[quote][p][bold]SwindonWatcher[/bold] wrote: Just another example to prove that the law is an Ar#e!!!! The yobs of today are too lazy to work but think it is ok to steal other peoples property. I hope the item is recovered. Lock them up and keep them locked up I say.[/p][/quote]The law itself is not an ****. Indeed, the judiciary's own Sentencing Guidelines often allow for quite harsh maximum sentences. For example the crime Cookson was convicted of this time was Burglary (domestic). Under the Theft Act 1968 s.9(3)(a) the judge had a maximum sentence of 14 years available to him/her. As the convict was a repeat offender who had barely just been released (halfway through) his previous sentence, the most recent crime should have been dealt with more severely. Also, there were several aggravating factors to the crime and he was in possession of a knife. Even taking into account the reduced sentence the judge would have given for the guilty plea (despite it being likely there was forensic evidence such that a not guilty plea would have been ridiculous) it is entirely inexplicable that anything less than a four year sentence would have been handed down in this case. I would also recommend that Ms Coady considers reporting the sentence as unduly lenient to the Attorney General: https://www.gov.uk/c omplain-about-low-cr own-court-sentence Interesting to note the Adver have chosen to omit the name of the judge concerned in this case. I wonder if it was the same one who jailed him for the last raft of burglaries (which were committed whilst he was on bail for previous crimes): http://www.thisiswil tshire.co.uk/news/10 646988.Teenager_jail ed_for_burglaries/ This quote from the above article rather says it all: [quote] When he is released from youth custody he said the authorities will help him with accommodation and he will have a chance to lead a law-abiding life. [/quote] That went well. ChannelX
  • Score: 11

1:26pm Tue 11 Mar 14

SwindonWatcher says...

ChannelX wrote:
SwindonWatcher wrote:
Just another example to prove that the law is an Ar#e!!!!

The yobs of today are too lazy to work but think it is ok to steal other peoples property. I hope the item is recovered.

Lock them up and keep them locked up I say.
The law itself is not an ****. Indeed, the judiciary's own Sentencing Guidelines often allow for quite harsh maximum sentences.

For example the crime Cookson was convicted of this time was Burglary (domestic). Under the Theft Act 1968 s.9(3)(a) the judge had a maximum sentence of 14 years available to him/her.

As the convict was a repeat offender who had barely just been released (halfway through) his previous sentence, the most recent crime should have been dealt with more severely.

Also, there were several aggravating factors to the crime and he was in possession of a knife.

Even taking into account the reduced sentence the judge would have given for the guilty plea (despite it being likely there was forensic evidence such that a not guilty plea would have been ridiculous) it is entirely inexplicable that anything less than a four year sentence would have been handed down in this case.

I would also recommend that Ms Coady considers reporting the sentence as unduly lenient to the Attorney General:

https://www.gov.uk/c

omplain-about-low-cr

own-court-sentence

Interesting to note the Adver have chosen to omit the name of the judge concerned in this case. I wonder if it was the same one who jailed him for the last raft of burglaries (which were committed whilst he was on bail for previous crimes):

http://www.thisiswil

tshire.co.uk/news/10

646988.Teenager_jail

ed_for_burglaries/

This quote from the above article rather says it all:


When he is released from youth custody he said the authorities will help him with accommodation and he will have a chance to lead a law-abiding life.


That went well.
Well said.......although I stand with the law is an Ar#e comment.
[quote][p][bold]ChannelX[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SwindonWatcher[/bold] wrote: Just another example to prove that the law is an Ar#e!!!! The yobs of today are too lazy to work but think it is ok to steal other peoples property. I hope the item is recovered. Lock them up and keep them locked up I say.[/p][/quote]The law itself is not an ****. Indeed, the judiciary's own Sentencing Guidelines often allow for quite harsh maximum sentences. For example the crime Cookson was convicted of this time was Burglary (domestic). Under the Theft Act 1968 s.9(3)(a) the judge had a maximum sentence of 14 years available to him/her. As the convict was a repeat offender who had barely just been released (halfway through) his previous sentence, the most recent crime should have been dealt with more severely. Also, there were several aggravating factors to the crime and he was in possession of a knife. Even taking into account the reduced sentence the judge would have given for the guilty plea (despite it being likely there was forensic evidence such that a not guilty plea would have been ridiculous) it is entirely inexplicable that anything less than a four year sentence would have been handed down in this case. I would also recommend that Ms Coady considers reporting the sentence as unduly lenient to the Attorney General: https://www.gov.uk/c omplain-about-low-cr own-court-sentence Interesting to note the Adver have chosen to omit the name of the judge concerned in this case. I wonder if it was the same one who jailed him for the last raft of burglaries (which were committed whilst he was on bail for previous crimes): http://www.thisiswil tshire.co.uk/news/10 646988.Teenager_jail ed_for_burglaries/ This quote from the above article rather says it all: [quote] When he is released from youth custody he said the authorities will help him with accommodation and he will have a chance to lead a law-abiding life. [/quote] That went well.[/p][/quote]Well said.......although I stand with the law is an Ar#e comment. SwindonWatcher
  • Score: 7

1:43pm Tue 11 Mar 14

house on the hill says...

SwindonWatcher wrote:
ChannelX wrote:
SwindonWatcher wrote:
Just another example to prove that the law is an Ar#e!!!!

The yobs of today are too lazy to work but think it is ok to steal other peoples property. I hope the item is recovered.

Lock them up and keep them locked up I say.
The law itself is not an ****. Indeed, the judiciary's own Sentencing Guidelines often allow for quite harsh maximum sentences.

For example the crime Cookson was convicted of this time was Burglary (domestic). Under the Theft Act 1968 s.9(3)(a) the judge had a maximum sentence of 14 years available to him/her.

As the convict was a repeat offender who had barely just been released (halfway through) his previous sentence, the most recent crime should have been dealt with more severely.

Also, there were several aggravating factors to the crime and he was in possession of a knife.

Even taking into account the reduced sentence the judge would have given for the guilty plea (despite it being likely there was forensic evidence such that a not guilty plea would have been ridiculous) it is entirely inexplicable that anything less than a four year sentence would have been handed down in this case.

I would also recommend that Ms Coady considers reporting the sentence as unduly lenient to the Attorney General:

https://www.gov.uk/c


omplain-about-low-cr


own-court-sentence

Interesting to note the Adver have chosen to omit the name of the judge concerned in this case. I wonder if it was the same one who jailed him for the last raft of burglaries (which were committed whilst he was on bail for previous crimes):

http://www.thisiswil


tshire.co.uk/news/10


646988.Teenager_jail


ed_for_burglaries/

This quote from the above article rather says it all:


When he is released from youth custody he said the authorities will help him with accommodation and he will have a chance to lead a law-abiding life.


That went well.
Well said.......although I stand with the law is an Ar#e comment.
It isnt always that the LAW itself that is an a***, it is those who fail to enforce it on a realistic and regular basis who get paid masses of taxpayers money who are the real ar***. We need the 3 strikes and you are out law to stop these career criminals who just laugh at the justice system and treat their fellow man like sh1t! Lock them up and throw away the key.
[quote][p][bold]SwindonWatcher[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ChannelX[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SwindonWatcher[/bold] wrote: Just another example to prove that the law is an Ar#e!!!! The yobs of today are too lazy to work but think it is ok to steal other peoples property. I hope the item is recovered. Lock them up and keep them locked up I say.[/p][/quote]The law itself is not an ****. Indeed, the judiciary's own Sentencing Guidelines often allow for quite harsh maximum sentences. For example the crime Cookson was convicted of this time was Burglary (domestic). Under the Theft Act 1968 s.9(3)(a) the judge had a maximum sentence of 14 years available to him/her. As the convict was a repeat offender who had barely just been released (halfway through) his previous sentence, the most recent crime should have been dealt with more severely. Also, there were several aggravating factors to the crime and he was in possession of a knife. Even taking into account the reduced sentence the judge would have given for the guilty plea (despite it being likely there was forensic evidence such that a not guilty plea would have been ridiculous) it is entirely inexplicable that anything less than a four year sentence would have been handed down in this case. I would also recommend that Ms Coady considers reporting the sentence as unduly lenient to the Attorney General: https://www.gov.uk/c omplain-about-low-cr own-court-sentence Interesting to note the Adver have chosen to omit the name of the judge concerned in this case. I wonder if it was the same one who jailed him for the last raft of burglaries (which were committed whilst he was on bail for previous crimes): http://www.thisiswil tshire.co.uk/news/10 646988.Teenager_jail ed_for_burglaries/ This quote from the above article rather says it all: [quote] When he is released from youth custody he said the authorities will help him with accommodation and he will have a chance to lead a law-abiding life. [/quote] That went well.[/p][/quote]Well said.......although I stand with the law is an Ar#e comment.[/p][/quote]It isnt always that the LAW itself that is an a***, it is those who fail to enforce it on a realistic and regular basis who get paid masses of taxpayers money who are the real ar***. We need the 3 strikes and you are out law to stop these career criminals who just laugh at the justice system and treat their fellow man like sh1t! Lock them up and throw away the key. house on the hill
  • Score: 7

2:05pm Tue 11 Mar 14

DLP OldTown says...

Cut their hands off
Cut their hands off DLP OldTown
  • Score: 6

2:29pm Tue 11 Mar 14

KeyboardWarri0r says...

Chop his head off! with a blunt sword.
Chop his head off! with a blunt sword. KeyboardWarri0r
  • Score: 6

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