Solar farm in bid to enlarge

This Is Wiltshire: Rupert Burr, from Roves Farm Rupert Burr, from Roves Farm

the owners of Roves Farm are asking for permission to alter the capacity of a planned solar farm.

They were initially given permission three years ago to build a 5mw farm next to the visitor centre and farm but this has yet to be constructed.

However, in the time since that permission was granted, panels are now more efficient and so new plans are being considered which would potentially double the output on almost the same amount of land.

If it gets the go-ahead then all the power generated will be fed into the national grid, as there are already panels generating 100kw of electricity which is used to power the visitor centre.

A spokesman said: “We were given permission a number of years ago but since then the panels have become much more efficient.

“We can now produce much more power in the same area so it makes sense to try and change the permission we already have.

“Renewable energy is something which has always been seen as very important at Roves Farm.”

The parcel of land they are hoping to develop lies 500m north west of the main farm house and is just over 23 hectares in size.

Although the new plan would be a slight expansion on the original, the impact of solar farms is negligible once in place and is unlikely to be any different.

Roves Farm has been owned by Rupert and Joanna Burr since 1992.

Speaking at the time of the original application, Rupert said: “I look at places like Honda and the B&Q site and they will obviously need a lot of electricity.

“There are opportunities for us all to work together – those who produce the energy for local needs, we hope to sell this energy in the Swindon area. It is very much a local initiative.

“There will be no noise, no smell, no vehicle movement once it is all up and running and no visual impact. Once people understand this, there won’t be the same controversy that wind turbines would create.”

If the move gets the go ahead it could provide power for more than 1,000 homes over its 25 year life and will be the latest in a number of solar projects in the area.

Permission has been granted for solar farms at South Marston Farm and Sevor Farm, which will supply Honda.

A farm at Castle Eaton has also recently been approved as another solar site and a solar farm at Pentylands , in Highworth, will soon become operational.

Talks are also under way to build solar barriers along the A419 and M4, while two more sites have been identified for large scale farms at Chapel Farm and in Wroughton.

It is all part of the council’s ambition for Swindon to produce 100MW of renewable energy by 2020.

Comments (4)

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12:55pm Fri 13 Jun 14

Ollie Dognacky says...

I hope they have considered the possible peril of traffic barriers that could potentially electrocute drivers in an accident situation.
Also the direction of the A419.

Apart from that, I'm all for alternative energy and research
I hope they have considered the possible peril of traffic barriers that could potentially electrocute drivers in an accident situation. Also the direction of the A419. Apart from that, I'm all for alternative energy and research Ollie Dognacky
  • Score: -2

9:33pm Sat 14 Jun 14

Cooler says...

Good luck with your solar power plans Rupert.

Your father obviously had a sense of humour....

P.S. I have actually met Rupert and he is a great guy
Good luck with your solar power plans Rupert. Your father obviously had a sense of humour.... P.S. I have actually met Rupert and he is a great guy Cooler
  • Score: 0

5:35pm Mon 16 Jun 14

Mother of two says...

I think the solar fields are a great idea, improves ecology and provides a great meadow area for wildlife over an industrially farmed field which permits very little to live. One can hardly see them over the hedges or they appear as water form far away, they give us energy security so we don't have to buy from Europe to run all these new homes going up. Supports the farmer. The low subsidies we support via our bills at about £7 a household benefits us all rather than just the farmer, as I can now buy 100% green power to run my home at the same price as I was buying brown from SSE, instead of being forced to buy brown power I equally have to subsidise that I definitely dont want. Yes it looks different but but birds and the bees don't care about a humans view they just want a quiet place to thrive and solar farms are it. How inconsiderate we humans are to believe our right to a view is more important than the ecology we live along side that we are currently destroying. Fracking will be so ugly it will pale into insignificance in comparison to even wind! at no benefit to anyone apart from a misguided conception it might bring costs down. It certainly won't help the ecology directly or indirectly or reduce Co2 levels enough to matter. That requires 60% nuclear and 30% renewables and a diminishing 10% of fossil fuels.
I think the solar fields are a great idea, improves ecology and provides a great meadow area for wildlife over an industrially farmed field which permits very little to live. One can hardly see them over the hedges or they appear as water form far away, they give us energy security so we don't have to buy from Europe to run all these new homes going up. Supports the farmer. The low subsidies we support via our bills at about £7 a household benefits us all rather than just the farmer, as I can now buy 100% green power to run my home at the same price as I was buying brown from SSE, instead of being forced to buy brown power I equally have to subsidise that I definitely dont want. Yes it looks different but but birds and the bees don't care about a humans view they just want a quiet place to thrive and solar farms are it. How inconsiderate we humans are to believe our right to a view is more important than the ecology we live along side that we are currently destroying. Fracking will be so ugly it will pale into insignificance in comparison to even wind! at no benefit to anyone apart from a misguided conception it might bring costs down. It certainly won't help the ecology directly or indirectly or reduce Co2 levels enough to matter. That requires 60% nuclear and 30% renewables and a diminishing 10% of fossil fuels. Mother of two
  • Score: 0

8:25pm Thu 26 Jun 14

We're all doomed says...

Mother of two wrote:
I think the solar fields are a great idea, improves ecology and provides a great meadow area for wildlife over an industrially farmed field which permits very little to live. One can hardly see them over the hedges or they appear as water form far away, they give us energy security so we don't have to buy from Europe to run all these new homes going up. Supports the farmer. The low subsidies we support via our bills at about £7 a household benefits us all rather than just the farmer, as I can now buy 100% green power to run my home at the same price as I was buying brown from SSE, instead of being forced to buy brown power I equally have to subsidise that I definitely dont want. Yes it looks different but but birds and the bees don't care about a humans view they just want a quiet place to thrive and solar farms are it. How inconsiderate we humans are to believe our right to a view is more important than the ecology we live along side that we are currently destroying. Fracking will be so ugly it will pale into insignificance in comparison to even wind! at no benefit to anyone apart from a misguided conception it might bring costs down. It certainly won't help the ecology directly or indirectly or reduce Co2 levels enough to matter. That requires 60% nuclear and 30% renewables and a diminishing 10% of fossil fuels.
I can't understand why when the counsel agree planning permission for building like the B&Q warehouse or Honda for example they can't stipulate that they must cover their rooves with solar panels thus limiting the number of green fields used. Or cover the land where Woolworths warehouse used to be. Is this piece of land ever going to be used?
[quote][p][bold]Mother of two[/bold] wrote: I think the solar fields are a great idea, improves ecology and provides a great meadow area for wildlife over an industrially farmed field which permits very little to live. One can hardly see them over the hedges or they appear as water form far away, they give us energy security so we don't have to buy from Europe to run all these new homes going up. Supports the farmer. The low subsidies we support via our bills at about £7 a household benefits us all rather than just the farmer, as I can now buy 100% green power to run my home at the same price as I was buying brown from SSE, instead of being forced to buy brown power I equally have to subsidise that I definitely dont want. Yes it looks different but but birds and the bees don't care about a humans view they just want a quiet place to thrive and solar farms are it. How inconsiderate we humans are to believe our right to a view is more important than the ecology we live along side that we are currently destroying. Fracking will be so ugly it will pale into insignificance in comparison to even wind! at no benefit to anyone apart from a misguided conception it might bring costs down. It certainly won't help the ecology directly or indirectly or reduce Co2 levels enough to matter. That requires 60% nuclear and 30% renewables and a diminishing 10% of fossil fuels.[/p][/quote]I can't understand why when the counsel agree planning permission for building like the B&Q warehouse or Honda for example they can't stipulate that they must cover their rooves with solar panels thus limiting the number of green fields used. Or cover the land where Woolworths warehouse used to be. Is this piece of land ever going to be used? We're all doomed
  • Score: 0

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