Put end to offending

This Is Wiltshire: Fiona Price, SCA business development director Fiona Price, SCA business development director

OFFENDERS leaving custody in Swindon will have more support getting back on their feet as a new project begin in autumn.

Earlier this year, charity SCA received a £29,000 grant from the Police and Crime Commissioner’s £1m Innovation Fund to set up a tailored advocacy service for ex-offenders.

The project aims to reduce re-offending rates by engaging ex-offenders as they leave custody and equipping them with the tools they need to stop them resorting to crime.

Fiona Price, the director of business development at SCA, said: “We tend to find that a lot of the people who reoffend tend to do so because they leave custody and they don’t know how to go about finding work and they end up reoffending by stealing, and ending up in custody again.

“Our purpose is to give them that support and bring down those reoffending rates.

“We get referrals from the police from people about to leave custody in Swindon and we engage with them as soon as they leave custody.

“It’s particularly important for people who may have reoffended in the past and for particularly vulnerable people who need support when it comes to housing, employment, debt, advocacy, service, and help with claiming their benefits as well.”

Some ex-offenders are drawn into a cycle of crime because of the limited support they receive on leaving custody and this project is one of the first to be set up that aims to directly engage and support offenders.

Fiona said: “People seem to assume that if you give them the right list of numbers to call and tell them where they need to go that they will do it, but most of the time they don’t because they don’t know how and they don’t have the confidence to.

“It’s just not being talked about and people just don’t think about what support people need when they leave custody. There are lots of different people and organisations there to help and support people but sometimes it’s difficult for the offenders to know where to go and who to contact.”

The service, which has already been successfully set up in Southampton, is run almost entirely by volunteers supported by an advocacy manager, and now SCA is looking for around 45 people to sign up to help provide the service.

Fiona said: “We’re looking for people from all walks of life, all backgrounds and experiences who think they can support someone leaving custody and commit to a few hours each week.”

Comments (13)

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10:03am Thu 14 Aug 14

Sandor Clegane says...

c.56% of people who've been to prison re-offend and are convicted again within a year of their release. It makes little to no difference how they're dealt with once they're released - as the countless failures of the Probation service and so-called 'monitoring' only serves to highlight.

That figure has remained broadly the same since what we now recognise as the state prison system was introduced in Britain in 1816. Nothing's changed in 200 years, despite much messing around by the 'experts'.

The fact is that many criminals will always be criminals, it's therefore just a case of how many times society allows the judiciary to let them free to commit more crimes during their lives.
c.56% of people who've been to prison re-offend and are convicted again within a year of their release. It makes little to no difference how they're dealt with once they're released - as the countless failures of the Probation service and so-called 'monitoring' only serves to highlight. That figure has remained broadly the same since what we now recognise as the state prison system was introduced in Britain in 1816. Nothing's changed in 200 years, despite much messing around by the 'experts'. The fact is that many criminals will always be criminals, it's therefore just a case of how many times society allows the judiciary to let them free to commit more crimes during their lives. Sandor Clegane
  • Score: 8

10:12am Thu 14 Aug 14

benzss says...

Sandor Clegane wrote:
c.56% of people who've been to prison re-offend and are convicted again within a year of their release. It makes little to no difference how they're dealt with once they're released - as the countless failures of the Probation service and so-called 'monitoring' only serves to highlight.

That figure has remained broadly the same since what we now recognise as the state prison system was introduced in Britain in 1816. Nothing's changed in 200 years, despite much messing around by the 'experts'.

The fact is that many criminals will always be criminals, it's therefore just a case of how many times society allows the judiciary to let them free to commit more crimes during their lives.
Citation needed, no?

I thought recidivism was closer to 25% than 50%.

And if you're correct that recidivism rates have not really changed in 200 years, I'm not sure how harsher penalties will make a difference if, as you suggest, penalties are too lenient now.
[quote][p][bold]Sandor Clegane[/bold] wrote: c.56% of people who've been to prison re-offend and are convicted again within a year of their release. It makes little to no difference how they're dealt with once they're released - as the countless failures of the Probation service and so-called 'monitoring' only serves to highlight. That figure has remained broadly the same since what we now recognise as the state prison system was introduced in Britain in 1816. Nothing's changed in 200 years, despite much messing around by the 'experts'. The fact is that many criminals will always be criminals, it's therefore just a case of how many times society allows the judiciary to let them free to commit more crimes during their lives.[/p][/quote]Citation needed, no? I thought recidivism was closer to 25% than 50%. And if you're correct that recidivism rates have not really changed in 200 years, I'm not sure how harsher penalties will make a difference if, as you suggest, penalties are too lenient now. benzss
  • Score: -1

11:47am Thu 14 Aug 14

Hmmmf says...

Perhaps Ms Price can remind us what help victims get.
Perhaps Ms Price can remind us what help victims get. Hmmmf
  • Score: 7

12:19pm Thu 14 Aug 14

messyits says...

In reality criminals learn more about crime within prison they believe. The plain fact being they are learning from unsuccessful criminal who were caught.
In reality criminals learn more about crime within prison they believe. The plain fact being they are learning from unsuccessful criminal who were caught. messyits
  • Score: -3

12:38pm Thu 14 Aug 14

Sandor Clegane says...

benzss wrote:
Sandor Clegane wrote:
c.56% of people who've been to prison re-offend and are convicted again within a year of their release. It makes little to no difference how they're dealt with once they're released - as the countless failures of the Probation service and so-called 'monitoring' only serves to highlight.

That figure has remained broadly the same since what we now recognise as the state prison system was introduced in Britain in 1816. Nothing's changed in 200 years, despite much messing around by the 'experts'.

The fact is that many criminals will always be criminals, it's therefore just a case of how many times society allows the judiciary to let them free to commit more crimes during their lives.
Citation needed, no?

I thought recidivism was closer to 25% than 50%.

And if you're correct that recidivism rates have not really changed in 200 years, I'm not sure how harsher penalties will make a difference if, as you suggest, penalties are too lenient now.
The most recent government figures - obviously they have to be well over year old:


The proven re-offending rate for adult offenders released from custody between April 2011 and March 2012 was 45.8%,



The proven re-offending rate for juvenile offenders released from custody between April 2011 and March 2012 was 69.3%.


Combine the two figures and divide by two... a proven reoffending rate of all offenders released from custody is actually 57.55%

https://www.gov.uk/g
overnment/publicatio
ns/proven-reoffendin
g-statistics-april-2
011-march-2012

Obviously, these are just the proven reoffending rates, ie, those people were once again found guilty in a court of committing further crimes. As we know the crime detection rate hovers at around just 28%, it's reasonable to assume the ACTUAL reoffending rate is much higher than the c.60% proven rate.
[quote][p][bold]benzss[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Sandor Clegane[/bold] wrote: c.56% of people who've been to prison re-offend and are convicted again within a year of their release. It makes little to no difference how they're dealt with once they're released - as the countless failures of the Probation service and so-called 'monitoring' only serves to highlight. That figure has remained broadly the same since what we now recognise as the state prison system was introduced in Britain in 1816. Nothing's changed in 200 years, despite much messing around by the 'experts'. The fact is that many criminals will always be criminals, it's therefore just a case of how many times society allows the judiciary to let them free to commit more crimes during their lives.[/p][/quote]Citation needed, no? I thought recidivism was closer to 25% than 50%. And if you're correct that recidivism rates have not really changed in 200 years, I'm not sure how harsher penalties will make a difference if, as you suggest, penalties are too lenient now.[/p][/quote]The most recent government figures - obviously they have to be well over year old: [quote] The proven re-offending rate for adult offenders released from custody between April 2011 and March 2012 was 45.8%, [/quote] [quote] The proven re-offending rate for juvenile offenders released from custody between April 2011 and March 2012 was 69.3%. [/quote] Combine the two figures and divide by two... a proven reoffending rate of all offenders released from custody is actually 57.55% https://www.gov.uk/g overnment/publicatio ns/proven-reoffendin g-statistics-april-2 011-march-2012 Obviously, these are just the proven reoffending rates, ie, those people were once again found guilty in a court of committing further crimes. As we know the crime detection rate hovers at around just 28%, it's reasonable to assume the ACTUAL reoffending rate is much higher than the c.60% proven rate. Sandor Clegane
  • Score: 8

12:49pm Thu 14 Aug 14

house on the hill says...

messyits wrote:
In reality criminals learn more about crime within prison they believe. The plain fact being they are learning from unsuccessful criminal who were caught.
They may have been caught this time but they may well have had many successes and of course learning from your mistakes is always a great asset!

But agree with the previous poster, what about the help the victims get (or rather don't) compared to the convicted.
[quote][p][bold]messyits[/bold] wrote: In reality criminals learn more about crime within prison they believe. The plain fact being they are learning from unsuccessful criminal who were caught.[/p][/quote]They may have been caught this time but they may well have had many successes and of course learning from your mistakes is always a great asset! But agree with the previous poster, what about the help the victims get (or rather don't) compared to the convicted. house on the hill
  • Score: 6

2:44pm Thu 14 Aug 14

messyits says...

Figures envelop all crime-- much of which would not attract a prison term usually--however a suspended sentence could be actuated. Manipulating figures is a policy of some posters

They may have been caught this time but they may well have had many successes and of course learning from your mistakes is always a great asset!
IF they were successful before they made no mistakes which means the comment you make null and void
Figures envelop all crime-- much of which would not attract a prison term usually--however a suspended sentence could be actuated. Manipulating figures is a policy of some posters They may have been caught this time but they may well have had many successes and of course learning from your mistakes is always a great asset! IF they were successful before they made no mistakes which means the comment you make null and void messyits
  • Score: -5

3:34pm Thu 14 Aug 14

Sandor Clegane says...

The figures quoted are explicitly clear - they relate to those who have been released from a custodial sentence during a given period and who have then been arrested and convicted again within 12 months of their release.

No manipulation necessary or undertaken.

You may find it helps to actually read and properly comprehend the official data.

A further conviction is a further conviction, nobody - but you, it would seem - has said anything about the reoffending resulting in another custodial term.

Suspended sentences rarely, if ever, would apply to those who have just served an actual prison sentence.

So, if anyone is attempting to mislead, it's the character all too well known for arguing for argument's sake... and almost always erroneously.
The figures quoted are explicitly clear - they relate to those who have been released from a custodial sentence during a given period and who have then been arrested and convicted again within 12 months of their release. No manipulation necessary or undertaken. You may find it helps to actually read and properly comprehend the official data. A further conviction is a further conviction, nobody - but you, it would seem - has said anything about the reoffending resulting in another custodial term. Suspended sentences rarely, if ever, would apply to those who have just served an actual prison sentence. So, if anyone is attempting to mislead, it's the character all too well known for arguing for argument's sake... and almost always erroneously. Sandor Clegane
  • Score: 5

6:16pm Thu 14 Aug 14

messyits says...

Sandor Clegane wrote:
The figures quoted are explicitly clear - they relate to those who have been released from a custodial sentence during a given period and who have then been arrested and convicted again within 12 months of their release.

No manipulation necessary or undertaken.

You may find it helps to actually read and properly comprehend the official data.

A further conviction is a further conviction, nobody - but you, it would seem - has said anything about the reoffending resulting in another custodial term.

Suspended sentences rarely, if ever, would apply to those who have just served an actual prison sentence.

So, if anyone is attempting to mislead, it's the character all too well known for arguing for argument's sake... and almost always erroneously.
As with most of your claims--you cherry pick things that appear to support your inventive mind--perhaps you should read all the passages and amendments.
Likewise I suggest you view the sentencing guidelines on sentences suspended prior to a second offence being committed.
[quote][p][bold]Sandor Clegane[/bold] wrote: The figures quoted are explicitly clear - they relate to those who have been released from a custodial sentence during a given period and who have then been arrested and convicted again within 12 months of their release. No manipulation necessary or undertaken. You may find it helps to actually read and properly comprehend the official data. A further conviction is a further conviction, nobody - but you, it would seem - has said anything about the reoffending resulting in another custodial term. Suspended sentences rarely, if ever, would apply to those who have just served an actual prison sentence. So, if anyone is attempting to mislead, it's the character all too well known for arguing for argument's sake... and almost always erroneously.[/p][/quote]As with most of your claims--you cherry pick things that appear to support your inventive mind--perhaps you should read all the passages and amendments. Likewise I suggest you view the sentencing guidelines on sentences suspended prior to a second offence being committed. messyits
  • Score: -2

7:55am Fri 15 Aug 14

Sandor Clegane says...

This highlights precisely why so many repeat offenders continue to reoffend:

http://www.swindonad
vertiser.co.uk/news/
11411105.Burglar_let
_off_prison_sentence
/

Nothing more need be said.
This highlights precisely why so many repeat offenders continue to reoffend: http://www.swindonad vertiser.co.uk/news/ 11411105.Burglar_let _off_prison_sentence / Nothing more need be said. Sandor Clegane
  • Score: 5

10:04am Fri 15 Aug 14

messyits says...

Sandor Clegane wrote:
This highlights precisely why so many repeat offenders continue to reoffend:

http://www.swindonad

vertiser.co.uk/news/

11411105.Burglar_let

_off_prison_sentence

/

Nothing more need be said.
Ah yes--diverting as always. You do seem to forget the court has to consider a variety of reports prior to sentencing and the advocates can challenge these--if they believe either way the sentence is flawed--both parties have the right to appeal--a very fair system.
[quote][p][bold]Sandor Clegane[/bold] wrote: This highlights precisely why so many repeat offenders continue to reoffend: http://www.swindonad vertiser.co.uk/news/ 11411105.Burglar_let _off_prison_sentence / Nothing more need be said.[/p][/quote]Ah yes--diverting as always. You do seem to forget the court has to consider a variety of reports prior to sentencing and the advocates can challenge these--if they believe either way the sentence is flawed--both parties have the right to appeal--a very fair system. messyits
  • Score: -2

11:08am Sat 16 Aug 14

Sandor Clegane says...

messyits wrote:
Sandor Clegane wrote:
This highlights precisely why so many repeat offenders continue to reoffend:

http://www.swindonad


vertiser.co.uk/news/


11411105.Burglar_let


_off_prison_sentence


/

Nothing more need be said.
Ah yes--diverting as always. You do seem to forget the court has to consider a variety of reports prior to sentencing and the advocates can challenge these--if they believe either way the sentence is flawed--both parties have the right to appeal--a very fair system.
The system isn't 'fair' at all, it is entirely weighted in favour of the criminal/convict from start to finish.

That you don't seem aware of that only serves to show how little, or how biased, you are in such matters, as previous comments from you have explained and demonstrated.

The law, and Sentencing Guidelines, are quite clear. It is the judiciary that strives to overlook them. A serious problem that needs to be addressed and put right, and rapidly, if the public that funds this nonsense is ever to truly see a reduction in what is usually entirely predictable, and therefore preventable, crime.
[quote][p][bold]messyits[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Sandor Clegane[/bold] wrote: This highlights precisely why so many repeat offenders continue to reoffend: http://www.swindonad vertiser.co.uk/news/ 11411105.Burglar_let _off_prison_sentence / Nothing more need be said.[/p][/quote]Ah yes--diverting as always. You do seem to forget the court has to consider a variety of reports prior to sentencing and the advocates can challenge these--if they believe either way the sentence is flawed--both parties have the right to appeal--a very fair system.[/p][/quote]The system isn't 'fair' at all, it is entirely weighted in favour of the criminal/convict from start to finish. That you don't seem aware of that only serves to show how little, or how biased, you are in such matters, as previous comments from you have explained and demonstrated. The law, and Sentencing Guidelines, are quite clear. It is the judiciary that strives to overlook them. A serious problem that needs to be addressed and put right, and rapidly, if the public that funds this nonsense is ever to truly see a reduction in what is usually entirely predictable, and therefore preventable, crime. Sandor Clegane
  • Score: 3

12:24pm Sat 16 Aug 14

messyits says...

You are predictable--crime is not--or potential crooks would be caught at the scene.

Biassed--quite the opposite. I have been successful in numerous cases aided by a family member and an ex senior officer specialising in computer forensics currently examining a local case in which the person should have been imprisoned for a very long time--and of course also a man abusing his position in the community.

Sentencing guidelines work very well and prevent a flood of appeals either way.
You are predictable--crime is not--or potential crooks would be caught at the scene. Biassed--quite the opposite. I have been successful in numerous cases aided by a family member and an ex senior officer specialising in computer forensics currently examining a local case in which the person should have been imprisoned for a very long time--and of course also a man abusing his position in the community. Sentencing guidelines work very well and prevent a flood of appeals either way. messyits
  • Score: 0

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